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"Single Entry, Single Exit" was written when most programming was done in assembly language, FORTRAN, or COBOL. It has been widely misinterpreted, because modern languages do not support the practices Dijkstra was warning against.

"Single Entry" meant "do not create alternate entry points for functions". In assembly language, of course, it is possible to enter a function at any instruction. FORTRAN supported multiple entries to functions with the ENTRY statement:

      SUBROUTINE S(X, Y)
      R = SQRT(X*X + Y*Y)
C ALTERNATE ENTRY USED WHEN R IS ALREADY KNOWN
      ENTRY S2(R)
      ...
      RETURN
      END

C USAGE
      CALL S(3,4)
C ALTERNATE USAGE
      CALL S2(5)

"Single Exit" meant that a function should only return to one place: the statement immediately following the call. It did not mean that a function should only return from one place. When Structured Programming was written, it was common practice for a function to indicate an error by returning to an alternate location. FORTRAN supported this via "alternate return":

C SUBROUTINE WITH ALTERNATE RETURN.  THE '*' IS A PLACE HOLDER FOR THE ERROR RETURN
      SUBROUTINE QSOLVE(A, B, C, X1, X2, *)
      DISCR = B*B - 4*A*C
C NO SOLUTIONS, RETURN TO ERROR HANDLING LOCATION
      IF DISCR .LT. 0 RETURN 1
      SD = SQRT(DISCR)
      DENOM = 1.0 / (2*A)
      X1 = (-B + SD) / DENOM
      X2 = (-B - SD) / DENOM
      RETURN
      END

C USE OF ALTERNATE RETURN
      CALL QSOLVE(1, 0, 1, X1, X2, *99)
C SOLUTION FOUND
      ...
C QSOLVE RETURNS HERE IF NO SOLUTIONS
99    PRINT 'NO SOLUTIONS'

Both these techniques were highly error prone. Use of alternate entries often left some variable uninitialized. Use of alternate returns had all the problems of a GOTO statement, with the additional complication that the branch condition was not adjacent to the branch, but somewhere in the subroutine.

"Single Entry, Single Exit" was written when most programming was done in assembly language, FORTRAN, or COBOL. It has been widely misinterpreted, because modern languages do not support the practices Dijkstra was warning against.

"Single Entry" meant "do not create alternate entry points for functions". In assembly language, of course, it is possible to enter a function at any instruction. FORTRAN supported multiple entries to functions with the ENTRY statement:

      SUBROUTINE S(X, Y)
      R = SQRT(X*X + Y*Y)
C ALTERNATE ENTRY USED WHEN R IS ALREADY KNOWN
      ENTRY S2(R)
      ...
      RETURN
      END

C USAGE
      CALL S(3,4)
C ALTERNATE USAGE
      CALL S2(5)

"Single Exit" meant that a function should only return to one place: the statement immediately following the call. It did not mean that a function should only return from one place. When Structured Programming was written, it was common practice for a function to indicate an error by returning to an alternate location. FORTRAN supported this via "alternate return":

C SUBROUTINE WITH ALTERNATE RETURN.  THE '*' IS A PLACE HOLDER FOR THE ERROR RETURN
      SUBROUTINE QSOLVE(A, B, C, X1, X2, *)
      DISCR = B*B - 4*A*C
C NO SOLUTIONS, RETURN TO ERROR HANDLING LOCATION
      IF DISCR .LT. 0 RETURN 1
      SD = SQRT(DISCR)
      DENOM = 1.0 / (2*A)
      X1 = (-B + SD) / DENOM
      X2 = (-B - SD) / DENOM
      RETURN
      END

C USE OF ALTERNATE RETURN
      CALL QSOLVE(1, 0, 1, X1, X2, *99)
C SOLUTION FOUND
      ...
C QSOLVE RETURNS HERE IF NO SOLUTIONS
99    PRINT 'NO SOLUTIONS'

Both these techniques were highly error prone. Use of alternate entries often left some variable uninitialized. Use of alternate returns had all the problems of a GOTO statement, with the additional complication that the branch condition was not adjacent to the branch, but somewhere in the subroutine.

"Single Entry, Single Exit" was written when most programming was done in assembly language, FORTRAN, or COBOL. It has been widely misinterpreted, because modern languages do not support the practices Dijkstra was warning against.

"Single Entry" meant "do not create alternate entry points for functions". In assembly language, of course, it is possible to enter a function at any instruction. FORTRAN supported multiple entries to functions with the ENTRY statement:

      SUBROUTINE S(X, Y)
      R = SQRT(X*X + Y*Y)
C ALTERNATE ENTRY USED WHEN R IS ALREADY KNOWN
      ENTRY S2(R)
      ...
      RETURN
      END

C USAGE
      CALL S(3,4)
C ALTERNATE USAGE
      CALL S2(5)

"Single Exit" meant that a function should only return to one place: the statement immediately following the call. It did not mean that a function should only return from one place. When Structured Programming was written, it was common practice for a function to indicate an error by returning to an alternate location. FORTRAN supported this via "alternate return":

C SUBROUTINE WITH ALTERNATE RETURN.  THE '*' IS A PLACE HOLDER FOR THE ERROR RETURN
      SUBROUTINE QSOLVE(A, B, C, X1, X2, *)
      DISCR = B*B - 4*A*C
C NO SOLUTIONS, RETURN TO ERROR HANDLING LOCATION
      IF DISCR .LT. 0 RETURN 1
      SD = SQRT(DISCR)
      DENOM = 2*A
      X1 = (-B + SD) / DENOM
      X2 = (-B - SD) / DENOM
      RETURN
      END

C USE OF ALTERNATE RETURN
      CALL QSOLVE(1, 0, 1, X1, X2, *99)
C SOLUTION FOUND
      ...
C QSOLVE RETURNS HERE IF NO SOLUTIONS
99    PRINT 'NO SOLUTIONS'

Both these techniques were highly error prone. Use of alternate entries often left some variable uninitialized. Use of alternate returns had all the problems of a GOTO statement, with the additional complication that the branch condition was not adjacent to the branch, but somewhere in the subroutine.

    Post Made Community Wiki by Larry Cinnabar
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"Single Entry, Single Exit" was written when most programming was done in assembly language, FORTRAN, or COBOL. It has been widely misinterpreted, because modern languages do not support the practices Dijkstra was warning against.

"Single Entry" meant "do not create alternate entry points for functions". In assembly language, of course, it is possible to enter a function at any instruction. FORTRAN supported multiple entries to functions with the ENTRY statement:

      SUBROUTINE S(X, Y)
      R = SQRT(X*X + Y*Y)
C ALTERNATE ENTRY USED WHEN R IS ALREADY KNOWN
      ENTRY S2(R)
      ...
      RETURN
      END

C USAGE
      CALL S(3,4)
C ALTERNATE USAGE
      CALL S2(5)

"Single Exit" meant that a function should only return to one place: the statement immediately following the call. It did not mean that a function should only return from one place. When Structured Programming was written, it was common practice for a function to indicate an error by returning to an alternate location. FORTRAN supported this via "alternate return":

C SUBROUTINE WITH ALTERNATE RETURN.  THE '*' IS A PLACE HOLDER FOR THE ERROR RETURN
      SUBROUTINE QSOLVE(A, B, C, X1, X2, *)
      DISCR = B*B - 4*A*C
C NO SOLUTIONS, RETURN TO ERROR HANDLING LOCATION
      IF (B*B - 4*A*C)DISCR .LT. 0 RETURN 1
      SD = SQRT(B*B - 4*A*CDISCR)
      DENOM = 1.0 / (2*A)
      X1 = (-B + SD) / DENOM
      X2 = (-B - SD) / DENOM
      RETURN
      END

C USE OF ALTERNATE RETURN
      CALL QSOLVE(1, 0, 1, X1, X2, *99)
C SOLUTION FOUND
      ...
C QSOLVE RETURNS HERE IF NO SOLUTIONS
99    PRINT 'NO SOLUTIONS'

Both these techniques were highly error prone. Use of alternate entries often left some variable uninitialized. Use of alternate returns had all the problems of a GOTO statement, with the additional complication that the branch condition was not adjacent to the branch, but somewhere in the subroutine.

"Single Entry, Single Exit" was written when most programming was done in assembly language, FORTRAN, or COBOL. It has been widely misinterpreted, because modern languages do not support the practices Dijkstra was warning against.

"Single Entry" meant "do not create alternate entry points for functions". In assembly language, of course, it is possible to enter a function at any instruction. FORTRAN supported multiple entries to functions with the ENTRY statement:

      SUBROUTINE S(X, Y)
      R = SQRT(X*X + Y*Y)
C ALTERNATE ENTRY USED WHEN R IS ALREADY KNOWN
      ENTRY S2(R)
      ...
      RETURN
      END

C USAGE
      CALL S(3,4)
C ALTERNATE USAGE
      CALL S2(5)

"Single Exit" meant that a function should only return to one place: the statement immediately following the call. It did not mean that a function should only return from one place. When Structured Programming was written, it was common practice for a function to indicate an error by returning to an alternate location. FORTRAN supported this via "alternate return":

C SUBROUTINE WITH ALTERNATE RETURN.  THE '*' IS A PLACE HOLDER FOR THE ERROR RETURN
      SUBROUTINE QSOLVE(A, B, C, X1, X2, *)
C NO SOLUTIONS, RETURN TO ERROR HANDLING LOCATION
      IF (B*B - 4*A*C) .LT. 0 RETURN 1
      SD = SQRT(B*B - 4*A*C)
      DENOM = 1.0 / (2*A)
      X1 = (-B + SD) / DENOM
      X2 = (-B - SD) / DENOM
      RETURN
      END

C USE OF ALTERNATE RETURN
      CALL QSOLVE(1, 0, 1, X1, X2, *99)
C SOLUTION FOUND
      ...
C QSOLVE RETURNS HERE IF NO SOLUTIONS
99    PRINT 'NO SOLUTIONS'

Both these techniques were highly error prone. Use of alternate entries often left some variable uninitialized. Use of alternate returns had all the problems of a GOTO statement, with the additional complication that the branch condition was not adjacent to the branch, but somewhere in the subroutine.

"Single Entry, Single Exit" was written when most programming was done in assembly language, FORTRAN, or COBOL. It has been widely misinterpreted, because modern languages do not support the practices Dijkstra was warning against.

"Single Entry" meant "do not create alternate entry points for functions". In assembly language, of course, it is possible to enter a function at any instruction. FORTRAN supported multiple entries to functions with the ENTRY statement:

      SUBROUTINE S(X, Y)
      R = SQRT(X*X + Y*Y)
C ALTERNATE ENTRY USED WHEN R IS ALREADY KNOWN
      ENTRY S2(R)
      ...
      RETURN
      END

C USAGE
      CALL S(3,4)
C ALTERNATE USAGE
      CALL S2(5)

"Single Exit" meant that a function should only return to one place: the statement immediately following the call. It did not mean that a function should only return from one place. When Structured Programming was written, it was common practice for a function to indicate an error by returning to an alternate location. FORTRAN supported this via "alternate return":

C SUBROUTINE WITH ALTERNATE RETURN.  THE '*' IS A PLACE HOLDER FOR THE ERROR RETURN
      SUBROUTINE QSOLVE(A, B, C, X1, X2, *)
      DISCR = B*B - 4*A*C
C NO SOLUTIONS, RETURN TO ERROR HANDLING LOCATION
      IF DISCR .LT. 0 RETURN 1
      SD = SQRT(DISCR)
      DENOM = 1.0 / (2*A)
      X1 = (-B + SD) / DENOM
      X2 = (-B - SD) / DENOM
      RETURN
      END

C USE OF ALTERNATE RETURN
      CALL QSOLVE(1, 0, 1, X1, X2, *99)
C SOLUTION FOUND
      ...
C QSOLVE RETURNS HERE IF NO SOLUTIONS
99    PRINT 'NO SOLUTIONS'

Both these techniques were highly error prone. Use of alternate entries often left some variable uninitialized. Use of alternate returns had all the problems of a GOTO statement, with the additional complication that the branch condition was not adjacent to the branch, but somewhere in the subroutine.

3 Added END to Subroutine
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"Single Entry, Single Exit" was written when most programming was done in assembly language, FORTRAN, or COBOL. It has been widely misinterpreted, because modern languages do not support the practices Dijkstra was warning against.

"Single Entry" meant "do not create alternate entry points for functions". In assembly language, of course, it is possible to enter a function at any instruction. FORTRAN supported multiple entries to functions with the ENTRY statement:

      SUBROUTINE S(X, Y)
      R = SQRT(X*X + Y*Y)
C ALTERNATE ENTRY USED WHEN R IS ALREADY KNOWN
      ENTRY S2(R)
      ...
      RETURN
      ...END

C USAGE
      CALL S(3,4)
C ALTERNATE USAGE
      CALL S2(5)

"Single Exit" meant that a function should only return to one place: the statement immediately following the call. It did not mean that a function should only return from one place. When Structured Programming was written, it was common practice for a function to indicate an error by returning to an alternate location. FORTRAN supported this via "alternate return":

C SUBROUTINE WITH ALTERNATE RETURN.  THE '*' IS A PLACE HOLDER FOR THE ERROR RETURN
      SUBROUTINE QSOLVE(A, B, C, X1, X2, *)
C NO SOLUTIONS, RETURN TO ERROR HANDLING LOCATION
      IF (B*B - 4*A*C) .LT. 0 RETURN 1
      SD = SQRT(B*B - 4*A*C)
      DENOM = 1.0 / (2*A)
      X1 = (-B + SD) / DENOM
      X2 = (-B - SD) / DENOM
      RETURN
      END

C USE OF ALTERNATE RETURN
      CALL QSOLVE(1, 0, 1, X1, X2, *99)
C SOLUTION FOUND
      ...
C QSOLVE RETURNS HERE IF NO SOLUTIONS
99    PRINT 'NO SOLUTIONS'

Both these techniques were highly error prone. Use of alternate entries often left some variable uninitialized. Use of alternate returns had all the problems of a GOTO statement, with the additional complication that the branch condition was not adjacent to the branch, but somewhere in the subroutine.

"Single Entry, Single Exit" was written when most programming was done in assembly language, FORTRAN, or COBOL. It has been widely misinterpreted, because modern languages do not support the practices Dijkstra was warning against.

"Single Entry" meant "do not create alternate entry points for functions". In assembly language, of course, it is possible to enter a function at any instruction. FORTRAN supported multiple entries to functions with the ENTRY statement:

      SUBROUTINE S(X, Y)
      R = SQRT(X*X + Y*Y)
C ALTERNATE ENTRY USED WHEN R IS ALREADY KNOWN
      ENTRY S2(R)
      ...
      RETURN
      ...
C USAGE
      CALL S(3,4)
C ALTERNATE USAGE
      CALL S2(5)

"Single Exit" meant that a function should only return to one place: the statement immediately following the call. It did not mean that a function should only return from one place. When Structured Programming was written, it was common practice for a function to indicate an error by returning to an alternate location. FORTRAN supported this via "alternate return":

C SUBROUTINE WITH ALTERNATE RETURN.  THE '*' IS A PLACE HOLDER FOR THE ERROR RETURN
      SUBROUTINE QSOLVE(A, B, C, X1, X2, *)
C NO SOLUTIONS, RETURN TO ERROR HANDLING LOCATION
      IF (B*B - 4*A*C) .LT. 0 RETURN 1
      SD = SQRT(B*B - 4*A*C)
      DENOM = 1.0 / (2*A)
      X1 = (-B + SD) / DENOM
      X2 = (-B - SD) / DENOM
      RETURN

C USE OF ALTERNATE RETURN
      CALL QSOLVE(1, 0, 1, X1, X2, *99)
C SOLUTION FOUND
      ...
C QSOLVE RETURNS HERE IF NO SOLUTIONS
99    PRINT 'NO SOLUTIONS'

Both these techniques were highly error prone. Use of alternate entries often left some variable uninitialized. Use of alternate returns had all the problems of a GOTO statement, with the additional complication that the branch condition was not adjacent to the branch, but somewhere in the subroutine.

"Single Entry, Single Exit" was written when most programming was done in assembly language, FORTRAN, or COBOL. It has been widely misinterpreted, because modern languages do not support the practices Dijkstra was warning against.

"Single Entry" meant "do not create alternate entry points for functions". In assembly language, of course, it is possible to enter a function at any instruction. FORTRAN supported multiple entries to functions with the ENTRY statement:

      SUBROUTINE S(X, Y)
      R = SQRT(X*X + Y*Y)
C ALTERNATE ENTRY USED WHEN R IS ALREADY KNOWN
      ENTRY S2(R)
      ...
      RETURN
      END

C USAGE
      CALL S(3,4)
C ALTERNATE USAGE
      CALL S2(5)

"Single Exit" meant that a function should only return to one place: the statement immediately following the call. It did not mean that a function should only return from one place. When Structured Programming was written, it was common practice for a function to indicate an error by returning to an alternate location. FORTRAN supported this via "alternate return":

C SUBROUTINE WITH ALTERNATE RETURN.  THE '*' IS A PLACE HOLDER FOR THE ERROR RETURN
      SUBROUTINE QSOLVE(A, B, C, X1, X2, *)
C NO SOLUTIONS, RETURN TO ERROR HANDLING LOCATION
      IF (B*B - 4*A*C) .LT. 0 RETURN 1
      SD = SQRT(B*B - 4*A*C)
      DENOM = 1.0 / (2*A)
      X1 = (-B + SD) / DENOM
      X2 = (-B - SD) / DENOM
      RETURN
      END

C USE OF ALTERNATE RETURN
      CALL QSOLVE(1, 0, 1, X1, X2, *99)
C SOLUTION FOUND
      ...
C QSOLVE RETURNS HERE IF NO SOLUTIONS
99    PRINT 'NO SOLUTIONS'

Both these techniques were highly error prone. Use of alternate entries often left some variable uninitialized. Use of alternate returns had all the problems of a GOTO statement, with the additional complication that the branch condition was not adjacent to the branch, but somewhere in the subroutine.

2 added 189 characters in body
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