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When is optimization not premature and therefore not evil?When is optimization not premature and therefore not evil?

Whilst designing my own .Net SQL access library, I found that I want everything thing to run as fast as possible so I tend to look at the fastest ways of doing things. This often gets criticised as pre-mature optimisation when I am just looking for the fastest way of doing something.

My question is there a cross-over between designing for performance and pre-mature optimisation?

Possible Duplicate:
When is optimization not premature and therefore not evil?

Whilst designing my own .Net SQL access library, I found that I want everything thing to run as fast as possible so I tend to look at the fastest ways of doing things. This often gets criticised as pre-mature optimisation when I am just looking for the fastest way of doing something.

My question is there a cross-over between designing for performance and pre-mature optimisation?

Possible Duplicate:
When is optimization not premature and therefore not evil?

Whilst designing my own .Net SQL access library, I found that I want everything thing to run as fast as possible so I tend to look at the fastest ways of doing things. This often gets criticised as pre-mature optimisation when I am just looking for the fastest way of doing something.

My question is there a cross-over between designing for performance and pre-mature optimisation?

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Possible Duplicate:
When is optimization not premature and therefore not evil?

Whilst designing my own .Net SQL access library, I found that I want everything thing to run as fast as possible so I tend to look at the fastest ways of doing things. This often gets criticised as pre-mature optimisation when I am just looking for the fastest way of doing something.

My question is there a cross-over between designing for performance and pre-mature optimisation?

Whilst designing my own .Net SQL access library, I found that I want everything thing to run as fast as possible so I tend to look at the fastest ways of doing things. This often gets criticised as pre-mature optimisation when I am just looking for the fastest way of doing something.

My question is there a cross-over between designing for performance and pre-mature optimisation?

Possible Duplicate:
When is optimization not premature and therefore not evil?

Whilst designing my own .Net SQL access library, I found that I want everything thing to run as fast as possible so I tend to look at the fastest ways of doing things. This often gets criticised as pre-mature optimisation when I am just looking for the fastest way of doing something.

My question is there a cross-over between designing for performance and pre-mature optimisation?

    Post Closed as "exact duplicate" by Karl Bielefeldt, Robert Harvey, Aaronaught, Adam Lear of
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The cross-over between designing for performance/pre-mature optimisation

Whilst designing my own .Net SQL access library, I found that I want everything thing to run as fast as possible so I tend to look at the fastest ways of doing things. This often gets criticised as pre-mature optimisation when I am just looking for the fastest way of doing something.

My question is there a cross-over between designing for performance and pre-mature optimisation?