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I can think of a couple of reasons.

  1. Companies that employ software developers recognise that they are developing a product to give them some sort of business advantage (eg: direct revenue, a process, etc...). Regardless of the specifics of the advantage, the company is going to want to jealously protect their intellectual property. Yes, company execs can be a very suspicious lot when it comes to this sort of thing, so in their minds they might be thinking, 'why does this person only want to work for me part of the time? Is this person working for someone else? Could this person become a risk to my IP?'

  2. Companies are generally hiring people because they have determined a resourcing requirement that entails the need for a person to be working on a project for a certain amount of time in order to meet specific deadlines and targets. The view therefore is that someone working part time will not allow them to fulfil the resourcing requirement in it's entirety, and;

    a) The employer doesn't wish to face a need to employ additional staff,

    b) There may be additional costs associated with hiring multiple part time staf in terms of benefits, payroll taxes, etc.

  3. You are asking for a part time position when an advertised job may have specified full time. Sometimes people think it strange that a candidate does not seem to have understood the requirements specified in a job description, and that this might suggest if such simple directions are not followed, perhaps the candidate won't pay attention to specifications.

  4. You may have unwittingly presented the option in a way that makes it seem suspicious.

  5. Perhaps the interviewer has already decided not to hire you, and unwittingly gives away a negative reaction to a question they feel is no longer relevant.

Just a few thoughts... realistically speaking, most jobs in software development require full time staff. You may later earn an option to shift to part time work, or you may find one of the rare roles out there that allow this, but it's likely to be hard.

As to specifically answering your first question, I'd answer that with, why would an employer give up the option for a programmer working entirely for his company's benefit full time for someone who the employer feels will only be putting in an effort for part of the time?

I can think of a couple of reasons.

  1. Companies that employ software developers recognise that they are developing a product to give them some sort of business advantage (eg: direct revenue, a process, etc...). Regardless of the specifics of the advantage, the company is going to want to jealously protect their intellectual property. Yes, company execs can be a very suspicious lot when it comes to this sort of thing, so in their minds they might be thinking, 'why does this person only want to work for me part of the time? Is this person working for someone else? Could this person become a risk to my IP?'

  2. Companies are generally hiring people because they have determined a resourcing requirement that entails the need for a person to be working on a project for a certain amount of time in order to meet specific deadlines and targets. The view therefore is that someone working part time will not allow them to fulfil the resourcing requirement in it's entirety, and;

I can think of a couple of reasons.

  1. Companies that employ software developers recognise that they are developing a product to give them some sort of business advantage (eg: direct revenue, a process, etc...). Regardless of the specifics of the advantage, the company is going to want to jealously protect their intellectual property. Yes, company execs can be a very suspicious lot when it comes to this sort of thing, so in their minds they might be thinking, 'why does this person only want to work for me part of the time? Is this person working for someone else? Could this person become a risk to my IP?'

  2. Companies are generally hiring people because they have determined a resourcing requirement that entails the need for a person to be working on a project for a certain amount of time in order to meet specific deadlines and targets. The view therefore is that someone working part time will not allow them to fulfil the resourcing requirement in it's entirety, and;

    a) The employer doesn't wish to face a need to employ additional staff,

    b) There may be additional costs associated with hiring multiple part time staf in terms of benefits, payroll taxes, etc.

  3. You are asking for a part time position when an advertised job may have specified full time. Sometimes people think it strange that a candidate does not seem to have understood the requirements specified in a job description, and that this might suggest if such simple directions are not followed, perhaps the candidate won't pay attention to specifications.

  4. You may have unwittingly presented the option in a way that makes it seem suspicious.

  5. Perhaps the interviewer has already decided not to hire you, and unwittingly gives away a negative reaction to a question they feel is no longer relevant.

Just a few thoughts... realistically speaking, most jobs in software development require full time staff. You may later earn an option to shift to part time work, or you may find one of the rare roles out there that allow this, but it's likely to be hard.

As to specifically answering your first question, I'd answer that with, why would an employer give up the option for a programmer working entirely for his company's benefit full time for someone who the employer feels will only be putting in an effort for part of the time?

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I can think of a couple of reasons.

  1. Companies that employ software developers recognise that they are developing a product to give them some sort of business advantage (eg: direct revenue, a process, etc...). Regardless of the specifics of the advantage, the company is going to want to jealously protect their intellectual property. Yes, company execs can be a very suspicious lot when it comes to this sort of thing, so in their minds they might be thinking, 'why does this person only want to work for me part of the time? Is this person working for someone else? Could this person become a risk to my IP?'

  2. Companies are generally hiring people because they have determined a resourcing requirement that entails the need for a person to be working on a project for a certain amount of time in order to meet specific deadlines and targets. The view therefore is that someone working part time will not allow them to fulfil the resourcing requirement in it's entirety, and;