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The best practice, for the user, is obviously to make sure the second add fails. But this is going to slow your whole site down for the sake of the 0.1% case and you need to present all the options to the business, with pros and cons, and let them decide based on your advice.

For example, theThe most technically efficient solution, and the one to maximise sales, is to allow it to succeed and then try to fulfil both orders later -- just cause you don't have stock right now, doesn't mean you can't find it in an emergency. If you can't then someone has to contact the user who lucked out and apologise. But that is exactly what led to uproar before Christmas this year (this is not the only article that appeared, so apologies to Best Buy but it was the first I found).

I would advise any business notYour job is to take that approachpresent all the options to the business, but ifwith pros and cons, and let them decide based on your advice. If they choosecan afford an occasional small hit to doreputation to maximise sales then fair enough; if they can't and traffic is so anywaylow that you can check for double-updates quickly then that's also their call.

The best practice is obviously to make sure the second add fails. But this is going to slow your whole site down for the sake of the 0.1% case and you need to present all the options to the business, with pros and cons, and let them decide based on your advice.

For example, the most technically efficient solution, and the one to maximise sales, is to allow it to succeed and then try to fulfil both orders later -- just cause you don't have stock right now, doesn't mean you can't find it in an emergency. If you can't then someone has to contact the user who lucked out and apologise. But that is exactly what led to uproar before Christmas this year (this is not the only article that appeared, so apologies to Best Buy but it was the first I found).

I would advise any business not to take that approach, but if they choose to do so anyway then that's their call.

The best practice, for the user, is obviously to make sure the second add fails. But this is going to slow your whole site down for the sake of the 0.1% case.

The most technically efficient solution, and the one to maximise sales, is to allow it to succeed and then try to fulfil both orders later -- just cause you don't have stock right now, doesn't mean you can't find it in an emergency. If you can't then someone has to contact the user who lucked out and apologise. But that is exactly what led to uproar before Christmas this year (this is not the only article that appeared, so apologies to Best Buy but it was the first I found).

Your job is to present all the options to the business, with pros and cons, and let them decide based on your advice. If they can afford an occasional small hit to reputation to maximise sales then fair enough; if they can't and traffic is so low that you can check for double-updates quickly then that's also their call.

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source | link

The best practice is obviously to make sure the second add fails. But this is going to slow your whole site down for the sake of the 0.1% case and you need to present all the options to the business, with pros and cons, and let them decide based on your advice.

For example, the most technically efficient solution, and the one to maximise sales, is to allow it to succeed and then try to fulfil both orders later -- just cause you don't have stock right now, doesn't mean you can't find it in an emergency. If you can't then someone has to contact the user who lucked out and apologise. But that is exactly what led to uproar before Christmas this year (this is not the only article that appeared, so apologies to Best Buy but it was the first I found).

I would advise any business not to take that approach, but if they choose to do so anyway then that's their call.