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The only real way to tell if you have scalability issues is to test it, so test early, test often as Michael Borgwardt saysMichael Borgwardt says.

Other than that, a common reason why systems don't scale is because of resource contention. And that usually shows itself in the database --- trying to read and write at the same time. So you might want to think about using a CQRS approach that disconnects the read (Query) side from the write (Command) side.

The only real way to tell if you have scalability issues is to test it, so test early, test often as Michael Borgwardt says.

Other than that, a common reason why systems don't scale is because of resource contention. And that usually shows itself in the database --- trying to read and write at the same time. So you might want to think about using a CQRS approach that disconnects the read (Query) side from the write (Command) side.

The only real way to tell if you have scalability issues is to test it, so test early, test often as Michael Borgwardt says.

Other than that, a common reason why systems don't scale is because of resource contention. And that usually shows itself in the database --- trying to read and write at the same time. So you might want to think about using a CQRS approach that disconnects the read (Query) side from the write (Command) side.

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source | link

The only real way to tell if you have scalability issues is to test it, so test early, test often as Michael Borgwardt says.

Other than that, a common reason why systems don't scale is because of resource contention. And that usually shows itself in the database --- trying to read and write at the same time. So you might want to think about using a CQRS approach that disconnects the read (Query) side from the write (Command) side.