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My understanding of a primitive datatype is that

It is a datatype provided by a language implicitly (Others are user defined classes)

So different languages have different sets of datatypes which are considered primitive for that particular language. Is that right?

And what is the difference between a "basic datatype" and "built-in datatype". Wikipedia says a primitive datatype is either of the two.

PS - Why is "string" type considered as a primitive type in SNOBOL4 and not in Java ?

My understanding of a primitive datatype is that

It is a datatype provided by a language implicitly (Others are user defined classes)

So different languages have different sets of datatypes which are considered primitive for that particular language. Is that right?

And what is the difference between a "basic datatype" and "built-in datatype". Wikipedia says a primitive datatype is either of the two.

My understanding of a primitive datatype is that

It is a datatype provided by a language implicitly (Others are user defined classes)

So different languages have different sets of datatypes which are considered primitive for that particular language. Is that right?

And what is the difference between a "basic datatype" and "built-in datatype". Wikipedia says a primitive datatype is either of the two.

PS - Why is "string" type considered as a primitive type in SNOBOL4 and not in Java ?

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My understanding of a primitive datatype is that
"Its a datatype provided by a language implicitly (Others are user defined classes)"
So

It is a datatype provided by a language implicitly (Others are user defined classes)

So different languages have different sets of datatypes which are considered primitive for that particular language  . Is that right  ?
And

And what is the difference between a "basic datatype" and "built-in datatype"  . Wikipedia says a primitive datatype is either of the two  .

My understanding of a primitive datatype is that
"Its a datatype provided by a language implicitly (Others are user defined classes)"
So different languages have different sets of datatypes which are considered primitive for that particular language  . Is that right  ?
And what is the difference between a "basic datatype" and "built-in datatype"  . Wikipedia says a primitive datatype is either of the two  .

My understanding of a primitive datatype is that

It is a datatype provided by a language implicitly (Others are user defined classes)

So different languages have different sets of datatypes which are considered primitive for that particular language. Is that right?

And what is the difference between a "basic datatype" and "built-in datatype". Wikipedia says a primitive datatype is either of the two.

3 added 43 characters in body
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Can anyone explain me elaborately whats the meaningMy understanding of a "primitive data type"primitive datatype is that
"Its a datatype provided by a language implicitly (Others are user defined classes)"
So different languages have different sets of datatypes which are considered primitive for that particular language . Is that right ?

I tried it on
And what is the difference between a "basic datatype" and "built-in datatype" . Wikipedia, but says a primitive datatype is not clear enougheither of the two .

Can anyone explain me elaborately whats the meaning of a "primitive data type"?

I tried it on Wikipedia, but is not clear enough.

My understanding of a primitive datatype is that
"Its a datatype provided by a language implicitly (Others are user defined classes)"
So different languages have different sets of datatypes which are considered primitive for that particular language . Is that right ?
And what is the difference between a "basic datatype" and "built-in datatype" . Wikipedia says a primitive datatype is either of the two .

2 deleted 14 characters in body
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