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In one job we were forced to use some weird form of Hungarian notationHungarian notation in the database.

I can't remember the details, but from memory, each field name had to contain:

  • No vowels
  • All uppercase letters
  • A reference to the table
  • A data type indicator
  • A data length
  • A nullable indicator

For example, the column holding a person's first name might be called: PRSNFRSTNMVC30X (Person table, First Name column, Varchar 30 characters, Not Null)

In one job we were forced to use some weird form of Hungarian notation in the database.

I can't remember the details, but from memory, each field name had to contain:

  • No vowels
  • All uppercase letters
  • A reference to the table
  • A data type indicator
  • A data length
  • A nullable indicator

For example, the column holding a person's first name might be called: PRSNFRSTNMVC30X (Person table, First Name column, Varchar 30 characters, Not Null)

In one job we were forced to use some weird form of Hungarian notation in the database.

I can't remember the details, but from memory, each field name had to contain:

  • No vowels
  • All uppercase letters
  • A reference to the table
  • A data type indicator
  • A data length
  • A nullable indicator

For example, the column holding a person's first name might be called: PRSNFRSTNMVC30X (Person table, First Name column, Varchar 30 characters, Not Null)

1
source | link

In one job we were forced to use some weird form of Hungarian notation in the database.

I can't remember the details, but from memory, each field name had to contain:

  • No vowels
  • All uppercase letters
  • A reference to the table
  • A data type indicator
  • A data length
  • A nullable indicator

For example, the column holding a person's first name might be called: PRSNFRSTNMVC30X (Person table, First Name column, Varchar 30 characters, Not Null)