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"well designed""Well-designed" is subjective

What does "well designed" mean to you? to the Product Owner? to the Customer?

Is "well designed" a goal of the product owner? a goal of the customer? or just You?

Is what you consider "not well designed" still meeting the Product Owners expectations and making the customer happy? Then that is pretty "well designed".

Good Enough and YAGNI

Nothing in most Agile methodologies speaks of "well designed", because any system that the Product Owner accepts the stories as complete and the customers believe it meets their requirements is "well designed".

It is expected that the developers are professionals and will pragmatically use best practices, appropriate designs and idioms to implement the features and stories.

If you are not factoring in the time to do things correctly that is a developer problem, if the Product Owner is demanding things in less time that these can be done, it is their prerogative to do this, and your responsibility to educate them about the consequences in the form of technical debt stories.

SCRUM

The Agile Methodology that can be written down, isn't the Agile Methodology." - Jarrod Roberson

SCRUM is supposed to be a framework of tools to manage the total lifecycle of a software product. It isn't supposed to be a rigid set of things, just a good place to start and hopefully improve on.

Most shops I have worked in have what are called Sprint ZERO, Sprints for the senior members of the team to sketch out an overall architecture or theme of the product.

Stories that are larger than say 20 usually get broken down until they are actually a few 3 - 5 point Stories. One of these stories is, "As a team we need to meet to discuss how we are going to design this feature, so that we will have as little technical debt as possible givegiven the time allotted."

Generally

In general a "well designed" system, is Good Enough and follows YAGNI.

Agile, and SCRUM in particular as an implementation of Agile are more about how to produce a product as transparently as possible to the Product Owner / Sponsors.

It isn't about anything technical design/architecture wise. It is more a philosophy about how to approach delivering software that meets the customers needs and expectations. If there isn't what you call "well designed" parts, that is not a failing per se, as it is not a fundamental part of the philosophy.

"well designed" is subjective

What does "well designed" mean to you? to the Product Owner? to the Customer?

Is "well designed" a goal of the product owner? a goal of the customer? or just You?

Is what you consider "not well designed" still meeting the Product Owners expectations and making the customer happy? Then that is pretty "well designed".

Good Enough and YAGNI

Nothing in most Agile methodologies speaks of "well designed", because any system that the Product Owner accepts the stories as complete and the customers believe it meets their requirements is "well designed".

It is expected that the developers are professionals and will pragmatically use best practices, appropriate designs and idioms to implement the features and stories.

If you are not factoring in the time to do things correctly that is a developer problem, if the Product Owner is demanding things in less time that these can be done, it is their prerogative to do this, and your responsibility to educate them about the consequences in the form of technical debt stories.

SCRUM

The Agile Methodology that can be written down, isn't the Agile Methodology." - Jarrod Roberson

SCRUM is supposed to be a framework of tools to manage the total lifecycle of a software product. It isn't supposed to be a rigid set of things, just a good place to start and hopefully improve on.

Most shops I have worked in have what are called Sprint ZERO, Sprints for the senior members of the team to sketch out an overall architecture or theme of the product.

Stories that are larger than say 20 usually get broken down until they are actually a few 3 - 5 point Stories. One of these stories is, "As a team we need to meet to discuss how we are going to design this feature, so that we will have as little technical debt as possible give the time allotted."

Generally

In general a "well designed" system, is Good Enough and follows YAGNI.

Agile, and SCRUM in particular as an implementation of Agile are more about how to produce a product as transparently as possible to the Product Owner / Sponsors.

It isn't about anything technical design/architecture wise. It is more a philosophy about how to approach delivering software that meets the customers needs and expectations. If there isn't what you call "well designed" parts, that is not a failing per se, as it is not a fundamental part of the philosophy.

"Well-designed" is subjective

What does "well designed" mean to you? to the Product Owner? to the Customer?

Is "well designed" a goal of the product owner? a goal of the customer? or just You?

Is what you consider "not well designed" still meeting the Product Owners expectations and making the customer happy? Then that is pretty "well designed".

Good Enough and YAGNI

Nothing in most Agile methodologies speaks of "well designed", because any system that the Product Owner accepts the stories as complete and the customers believe it meets their requirements is "well designed".

It is expected that the developers are professionals and will pragmatically use best practices, appropriate designs and idioms to implement the features and stories.

If you are not factoring in the time to do things correctly that is a developer problem, if the Product Owner is demanding things in less time that these can be done, it is their prerogative to do this, and your responsibility to educate them about the consequences in the form of technical debt stories.

SCRUM

The Agile Methodology that can be written down, isn't the Agile Methodology." - Jarrod Roberson

SCRUM is supposed to be a framework of tools to manage the total lifecycle of a software product. It isn't supposed to be a rigid set of things, just a good place to start and hopefully improve on.

Most shops I have worked in have what are called Sprint ZERO, Sprints for the senior members of the team to sketch out an overall architecture or theme of the product.

Stories that are larger than say 20 usually get broken down until they are actually a few 3 - 5 point Stories. One of these stories is, "As a team we need to meet to discuss how we are going to design this feature, so that we will have as little technical debt as possible given the time allotted."

Generally

In general a "well designed" system, is Good Enough and follows YAGNI.

Agile, and SCRUM in particular as an implementation of Agile are more about how to produce a product as transparently as possible to the Product Owner / Sponsors.

It isn't about anything technical design/architecture wise. It is more a philosophy about how to approach delivering software that meets the customers needs and expectations. If there isn't what you call "well designed" parts, that is not a failing per se, as it is not a fundamental part of the philosophy.

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source | link

"well designed" is subjective

What does "well designed" mean to you? to the Product Owner? to the Customer?

Is "well designed" a goal of the product owner?

Is "well designed" a goal of the customer? or just You?

Is what you consider "not well designed" still meeting the Product Owners expectations and making the customer happy? Then that is pretty "well designed".

Good Enough and YAGNI

Nothing in most Agile methodologies speaks of "well designed", because any system that the Product Owner accepts the stories as complete and the customers believe it meets their requirements is "well designed".

It is expected that the developers are professionals and will pragmatically use best practices, appropriate designs and idioms to implement the features and stories.

If you are not factoring in the time to do things correctly that is a developer problem, if the Product Owner is demanding things in less time that these can be done, it is their prerogative to do this, and your responsibility to educate them about the consequences in the form of technical debt stories.

SCRUM

The Agile Methodology that can be written down, isn't the Agile Methodology." - Jarrod Roberson

SCRUM is supposed to be a framework of tools to manage the total lifecycle of a software product. It isn't supposed to be a rigid set of things, just a good place to start and hopefully improve on.

Most shops I have worked in have what are called Sprint ZERO, Sprints for the senior members of the team to sketch out an overall architecture or theme of the product.

Stories that are larger than say 20 usually get broken down until they are actually a few 3 - 5 point Stories. One of these stories is, "As a team we need to meet to discuss how we are going to design this feature, so that we will have as little technical debt as possible give the time allotted."

Generally

In general a "well designed" system, is Good Enough and follows YAGNI.

Agile, and SCRUM in particular as an implementation of Agile are more about how to produce a product as transparently as possible to the Product Owner / Sponsors.

It isn't about anything technical design/architecture wise. It is more a philosophy about how to approach delivering software that meets the customers needs and expectations. If there isn't what you call "well designed" parts, that is not a failing per se, as it is not a fundamental part of the philosophy.

"well designed" is subjective

What does "well designed" mean to you? to the Product Owner? to the Customer?

Is "well designed" a goal of the product owner?

Is "well designed" a goal of the customer?

Is "not well designed" still meeting the Product Owners expectations and making the customer happy?

Good Enough and YAGNI

Nothing in most Agile methodologies speaks of "well designed", because any system that the Product Owner accepts the stories as complete and the customers believe it meets their requirements is "well designed".

It is expected that the developers are professionals and will pragmatically use best practices, appropriate designs and idioms to implement the features and stories.

If you are not factoring in the time to do things correctly that is a developer problem, if the Product Owner is demanding things in less time that these can be done, it is their prerogative to do this, and your responsibility to educate them about the consequences in the form of technical debt stories.

SCRUM

The Agile Methodology that can be written down, isn't the Agile Methodology." - Jarrod Roberson

SCRUM is supposed to be a framework of tools to manage the total lifecycle of a software product. It isn't supposed to be a rigid set of things, just a good place to start and hopefully improve on.

Most shops I have worked in have what are called Sprint ZERO, Sprints for the senior members of the team to sketch out an overall architecture or theme of the product.

Stories that are larger than say 20 usually get broken down until they are actually a few 3 - 5 point Stories. One of these stories is, "As a team we need to meet to discuss how we are going to design this feature, so that we will have as little technical debt as possible give the time allotted."

Generally

In general a "well designed" system, is Good Enough and follows YAGNI.

"well designed" is subjective

What does "well designed" mean to you? to the Product Owner? to the Customer?

Is "well designed" a goal of the product owner? a goal of the customer? or just You?

Is what you consider "not well designed" still meeting the Product Owners expectations and making the customer happy? Then that is pretty "well designed".

Good Enough and YAGNI

Nothing in most Agile methodologies speaks of "well designed", because any system that the Product Owner accepts the stories as complete and the customers believe it meets their requirements is "well designed".

It is expected that the developers are professionals and will pragmatically use best practices, appropriate designs and idioms to implement the features and stories.

If you are not factoring in the time to do things correctly that is a developer problem, if the Product Owner is demanding things in less time that these can be done, it is their prerogative to do this, and your responsibility to educate them about the consequences in the form of technical debt stories.

SCRUM

The Agile Methodology that can be written down, isn't the Agile Methodology." - Jarrod Roberson

SCRUM is supposed to be a framework of tools to manage the total lifecycle of a software product. It isn't supposed to be a rigid set of things, just a good place to start and hopefully improve on.

Most shops I have worked in have what are called Sprint ZERO, Sprints for the senior members of the team to sketch out an overall architecture or theme of the product.

Stories that are larger than say 20 usually get broken down until they are actually a few 3 - 5 point Stories. One of these stories is, "As a team we need to meet to discuss how we are going to design this feature, so that we will have as little technical debt as possible give the time allotted."

Generally

In general a "well designed" system, is Good Enough and follows YAGNI.

Agile, and SCRUM in particular as an implementation of Agile are more about how to produce a product as transparently as possible to the Product Owner / Sponsors.

It isn't about anything technical design/architecture wise. It is more a philosophy about how to approach delivering software that meets the customers needs and expectations. If there isn't what you call "well designed" parts, that is not a failing per se, as it is not a fundamental part of the philosophy.

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source | link

"well designed" is subjective

What does "well designed" mean to you? to the Product Owner? to the Customer?

Is "well designed" a goal of the product owner?

Is "well designed" a goal of the customer?

Is "not well designed" still meeting the Product Owners expectations and making the customer happy?

Good Enough and YAGNI

Nothing in most Agile methodologies speaks of "well designed", because any system that the Product Owner accepts the stories as complete and the customers believe it meets their requirements is "well designed".

It is expected that the developers are professionals and will pragmatically use best practices, appropriate designs and idioms to implement the features and stories.

If you are not factoring in the time to do things correctly that is a developer problem, if the Product Owner is demanding things in less time that these can be done, it is their prerogative to do this, and your responsibility to educate them about the consequences in the form of technical debt stories.

SCRUM

The Agile Methodology that can be written down, isn't the Agile Methodology." - Jarrod Roberson

SCRUM is supposed to be a framework of tools to manage the total lifecycle of a software product. It isn't supposed to be a rigid set of things, just a good place to start and hopefully improve on.

Most shops I have worked in have what are called Sprint ZERO, Sprints for the senior members of the team to sketch out an overall architecture or theme of the product.

Stories that are larger than say 20 usually get broken down until they are actually a few 3 - 5 point Stories. One of these stories is, "As a team we need to meet to discuss how we are going to design this feature, so that we will have as little technical debt as possible give the time allotted."

Generally

In general a "well designed" system, is Good Enough and follows YAGNI.

"well designed" is subjective

What does "well designed" mean to you? to the Product Owner? to the Customer?

Is "well designed" a goal of the product owner?

Is "well designed" a goal of the customer?

Is "not well designed" still meeting the Product Owners expectations and making the customer happy?

Good Enough and YAGNI

Nothing in most Agile methodologies speaks of "well designed", because any system that the Product Owner accepts the stories as complete and the customers believe it meets their requirements is "well designed".

It is expected that the developers are professionals and will pragmatically use best practices, appropriate designs and idioms to implement the features and stories.

If you are not factoring in the time to do things correctly that is a developer problem, if the Product Owner is demanding things in less time that these can be done, it is their prerogative to do this, and your responsibility to educate them about the consequences in the form of technical debt stories.

Generally

In general a "well designed" system, is Good Enough and follows YAGNI.

"well designed" is subjective

What does "well designed" mean to you? to the Product Owner? to the Customer?

Is "well designed" a goal of the product owner?

Is "well designed" a goal of the customer?

Is "not well designed" still meeting the Product Owners expectations and making the customer happy?

Good Enough and YAGNI

Nothing in most Agile methodologies speaks of "well designed", because any system that the Product Owner accepts the stories as complete and the customers believe it meets their requirements is "well designed".

It is expected that the developers are professionals and will pragmatically use best practices, appropriate designs and idioms to implement the features and stories.

If you are not factoring in the time to do things correctly that is a developer problem, if the Product Owner is demanding things in less time that these can be done, it is their prerogative to do this, and your responsibility to educate them about the consequences in the form of technical debt stories.

SCRUM

The Agile Methodology that can be written down, isn't the Agile Methodology." - Jarrod Roberson

SCRUM is supposed to be a framework of tools to manage the total lifecycle of a software product. It isn't supposed to be a rigid set of things, just a good place to start and hopefully improve on.

Most shops I have worked in have what are called Sprint ZERO, Sprints for the senior members of the team to sketch out an overall architecture or theme of the product.

Stories that are larger than say 20 usually get broken down until they are actually a few 3 - 5 point Stories. One of these stories is, "As a team we need to meet to discuss how we are going to design this feature, so that we will have as little technical debt as possible give the time allotted."

Generally

In general a "well designed" system, is Good Enough and follows YAGNI.

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