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No. Profilers can quickly and adequately tell you exactly where the problem spots are.

The reason why some frameworks are problematic is because when the problem spot is in a framework or virtual machine function, you are screwed. If you have, realistically, complete performance control over the application then go nuts. This is why you can tell when an app is launched with Java- when the slowdown is in the JVM code, there's nothing any dev can do about it. However, this tends not to be an issue with C++ development in general.

Not to mention that the power of compilers to cut the crap and make your very high-level code go much faster grows every year.

Is there any comparisons of software that's using only very lean and smart code vs software that uses generic containers all over the place?

Hate to break it to you, buddy, but generic containers are lean and smart. One of their primary advantages is that because you don't have to re-write them for every type that ever lived, you can afford to write high-performance code once and re-use it. It's a simple application of DRY that improves both performance and reliability. Writing it yourself 999999 times isn't the smart code, that's the dumb code.

No. Profilers can quickly and adequately tell you exactly where the problem spots are.

The reason why some frameworks are problematic is because when the problem spot is in a framework or virtual machine function, you are screwed. If you have, realistically, complete performance control over the application then go nuts. This is why you can tell when an app is launched with Java- when the slowdown is in the JVM code, there's nothing any dev can do about it. However, this tends not to be an issue with C++ development in general.

Not to mention that the power of compilers to cut the crap and make your very high-level code go much faster grows every year.

No. Profilers can quickly and adequately tell you exactly where the problem spots are.

The reason why some frameworks are problematic is because when the problem spot is in a framework or virtual machine function, you are screwed. If you have, realistically, complete performance control over the application then go nuts. This is why you can tell when an app is launched with Java- when the slowdown is in the JVM code, there's nothing any dev can do about it. However, this tends not to be an issue with C++ development in general.

Not to mention that the power of compilers to cut the crap and make your very high-level code go much faster grows every year.

Is there any comparisons of software that's using only very lean and smart code vs software that uses generic containers all over the place?

Hate to break it to you, buddy, but generic containers are lean and smart. One of their primary advantages is that because you don't have to re-write them for every type that ever lived, you can afford to write high-performance code once and re-use it. It's a simple application of DRY that improves both performance and reliability. Writing it yourself 999999 times isn't the smart code, that's the dumb code.

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source | link

No. Profilers can quickly and adequately tell you exactly where the problem spots are.

The reason why some frameworks are problematic is because when the problem spot is in a framework or virtual machine function, you are screwed. If you have, realistically, complete performance control over the application then go nuts. This is why you can tell when an app is launched with Java- when the slowdown is in the JVM code, there's nothing any dev can do about it. However, this tends not to be an issue with C++ development in general.

Not to mention that the power of compilers to cut the crap and make your very high-level code go much faster grows every year.