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There are two good reasons not to rename variables in legacy code.

(1) unless you're using an automated refactoring tool, the possibility of intruducingintroducing bugs is high. Hence, "if it's not broken, don't fix it"

(2) you will make comparing current versions with past versions, in order to see what changed, impossible. This will make future maintenance of the code more difficult.

There are two good reasons not to rename variables in legacy code.

(1) unless you're using an automated refactoring tool, the possibility of intruducing bugs is high. Hence, "if it's not broken, don't fix it"

(2) you will make comparing current versions with past versions, in order to see what changed, impossible. This will make future maintenance of the code more difficult.

There are two good reasons not to rename variables in legacy code.

(1) unless you're using an automated refactoring tool, the possibility of introducing bugs is high. Hence, "if it's not broken, don't fix it"

(2) you will make comparing current versions with past versions, in order to see what changed, impossible. This will make future maintenance of the code more difficult.

1
source | link

There are two good reasons not to rename variables in legacy code.

(1) unless you're using an automated refactoring tool, the possibility of intruducing bugs is high. Hence, "if it's not broken, don't fix it"

(2) you will make comparing current versions with past versions, in order to see what changed, impossible. This will make future maintenance of the code more difficult.