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There is only one solution. Reserve around 10-20% of project/work time for refactoring. If it's difficult to convince the management that it is a justifiable task give them the only real argument: without refactoring the cost of code maintenance will grow exponentially over time. It's good to have a few metrics/articles/research results to back up this thesis during the meeting with the manager :)

Edit: there are a few good resources on "refactoring vs rising costs of maintenance" mentioned in this whitepaper: http://www.omnext.net/downloads/Whitepaper_Omnext.pdf

There is only one solution. Reserve around 10-20% of project/work time for refactoring. If it's difficult to convince the management that it is a justifiable task give them the only real argument: without refactoring the cost of code maintenance will grow exponentially over time. It's good to have a few metrics/articles/research results to back up this thesis during the meeting with the manager :)

There is only one solution. Reserve around 10-20% of project/work time for refactoring. If it's difficult to convince the management that it is a justifiable task give them the only real argument: without refactoring the cost of code maintenance will grow exponentially over time. It's good to have a few metrics/articles/research results to back up this thesis during the meeting with the manager :)

Edit: there are a few good resources on "refactoring vs rising costs of maintenance" mentioned in this whitepaper: http://www.omnext.net/downloads/Whitepaper_Omnext.pdf

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There is only one solution. Reserve around 10-20% of project/work time for refactoring. If it's difficult to convince the management that it is a justifiable task give them the only real argument: without refactoring the cost of code maintenance will grow exponentially over time. It's good to have a few metrics/articles/research results to back up this thesis during the meeting with the manager :)