2 Fixed typo and removed filler word.
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Lisp dialects have a unique niche due to their simple syntax. This simple syntax makes meta programming through the use of macros very simple. This allows you to model the language to suit your problem domain instead of modeling to fit your problem domain into your language. It's really cool once you get your head around it, and it lets you do a lot of things easily that is very difficult in other languages.

The downside, is that since every Lisp program essentially defines its own language, you really need a solid grasp on things to understand what is going on.

Now, to answer your questions...

  1. ClosureClojure is a modern Lisp dialect that runs in the JVM/CLR. This makes it easy to take advantage of the power of Lisp in an existing infrastructure.

  2. It is essential to understand how to use macros to build Lisp to your problem domain to appreciate its usage. I really only understood this after implementing a Lisp runtime, when I found that much of the core language features can easily be implemented in Lisp itself. It takes a fair sized project to get this.

Now itsIts pluses aside, although it is fun to program in, I personally don't have many cases where I would turn to it for daily problems. It is a very good tool to learn for mind expansion, and after learning Lisp properly, it became much more natural to take advantage of meta programming facilities in other languages.

The simple syntax makes it easy for computers to interpret (allowing such easy powerful macros), but it makes it very difficult for a human to parse complex expressions quickly.

Lisp dialects have a unique niche due to their simple syntax. This simple syntax makes meta programming through the use of macros very simple. This allows you to model the language to suit your problem domain instead of modeling to fit your problem domain into your language. It's really cool once you get your head around it, and it lets you do a lot of things easily that is very difficult in other languages.

The downside, is that since every Lisp program essentially defines its own language, you really need a solid grasp on things to understand what is going on.

Now, to answer your questions...

  1. Closure is a modern Lisp dialect that runs in the JVM/CLR. This makes it easy to take advantage of the power of Lisp in an existing infrastructure.

  2. It is essential to understand how to use macros to build Lisp to your problem domain to appreciate its usage. I really only understood this after implementing a Lisp runtime, when I found that much of the core language features can easily be implemented in Lisp itself. It takes a fair sized project to get this.

Now its pluses aside, although it is fun to program in, I personally don't have many cases where I would turn to it for daily problems. It is a very good tool to learn for mind expansion, and after learning Lisp properly, it became much more natural to take advantage of meta programming facilities in other languages.

The simple syntax makes it easy for computers to interpret (allowing such easy powerful macros), but it makes it very difficult for a human to parse complex expressions quickly.

Lisp dialects have a unique niche due to their simple syntax. This simple syntax makes meta programming through the use of macros very simple. This allows you to model the language to suit your problem domain instead of modeling to fit your problem domain into your language. It's really cool once you get your head around it, and it lets you do a lot of things easily that is very difficult in other languages.

The downside, is that since every Lisp program essentially defines its own language, you really need a solid grasp on things to understand what is going on.

Now, to answer your questions...

  1. Clojure is a modern Lisp dialect that runs in the JVM/CLR. This makes it easy to take advantage of the power of Lisp in an existing infrastructure.

  2. It is essential to understand how to use macros to build Lisp to your problem domain to appreciate its usage. I really only understood this after implementing a Lisp runtime, when I found that much of the core language features can easily be implemented in Lisp itself. It takes a fair sized project to get this.

Its pluses aside, although it is fun to program in, I personally don't have many cases where I would turn to it for daily problems. It is a very good tool to learn for mind expansion, and after learning Lisp properly, it became much more natural to take advantage of meta programming facilities in other languages.

The simple syntax makes it easy for computers to interpret (allowing such easy powerful macros), but it makes it very difficult for a human to parse complex expressions quickly.

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Lisp dialects have a unique niche due to their simple syntax. This simple syntax makes meta programming through the use of macros very simple. This allows you to model the language to suit your problem domain instead of modeling to fit your problem domain into your language. It's really cool once you get your head around it, and it lets you do a lot of things easily that is very difficult in other languages.

The downside, is that since every Lisp program essentially defines its own language, you really need a solid grasp on things to understand what is going on.

Now, to answer your questions...

  1. Closure is a modern Lisp dialect that runs in the JVM/CLR. This makes it easy to take advantage of the power of Lisp in an existing infrastructure.

  2. It is essential to understand how to use macros to build Lisp to your problem domain to appreciate its usage. I really only understood this after implementing a Lisp runtime, when I found that much of the core language features can easily be implemented in Lisp itself. It takes a fair sized project to get this.

Now its pluses aside, although it is fun to program in, I personally don't have many cases where I would turn to it for daily problems. It is a very good tool to learn for mind expansion, and after learning Lisp properly, it became much more natural to take advantage of meta programming facilities in other languages.

The simple syntax makes it easy for computers to interpret (allowing such easy powerful macros), but it makes it very difficult for a human to parse complex expressions quickly.