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  1. No, the demand for programmers is not going to decrease any time soon. If anything, it will continue to increase.

  2. No, the demand for engineers is not going to decrease any time soon. If anything, it will continue to increase as well.

  3. The salaries are comparable, and both will remain reasonably well paid.


Probably not the answers you were looking for since they don't help you make a decision.

Both are excellent fields if you enjoy that type of work.

I will attempt to draw some comparisons between the two fields, but I'm explicitly trying to sidestep a flame-war.

Traditional Engineering fields (electrical, mechanical, civil, chemical, etc...) tend to be more structured in the work that is performed. Their body of knowledge is not growing at the rapid rate that programming is seeing.

Programming (Computer Science) and Software Engineering, are fields that are still in their formative state. Their collective body of knowledge is growing at quite literally an explosive rate. Drawing a comparison between those two related fields can be done, but doesn't serve much purpose in this case.

Work in any of those fields can be very fulfilling. Traditional Engineering tends to be more concrete - you generally can see the results of your work with your own eyes. Programming (CompSci and SE) tends to be more abstract or virtual. It's harder to "see" the results of your work. Don't read too far into that generalization though.

If you're down to picking between Computer Science and Software Engineering, then consider which Universities you are planning on attending and evaluate their programs from there. Long term, I don't believe your career aspects will be impacted that much by picking one degree program versus the other.

  1. No, the demand for programmers is not going to decrease any time soon. If anything, it will continue to increase.

  2. No, the demand for engineers is not going to decrease any time soon. If anything, it will continue to increase as well.

  3. The salaries are comparable, and both will remain reasonably well paid.

  1. No, the demand for programmers is not going to decrease any time soon. If anything, it will continue to increase.

  2. No, the demand for engineers is not going to decrease any time soon. If anything, it will continue to increase as well.

  3. The salaries are comparable, and both will remain reasonably well paid.


Probably not the answers you were looking for since they don't help you make a decision.

Both are excellent fields if you enjoy that type of work.

I will attempt to draw some comparisons between the two fields, but I'm explicitly trying to sidestep a flame-war.

Traditional Engineering fields (electrical, mechanical, civil, chemical, etc...) tend to be more structured in the work that is performed. Their body of knowledge is not growing at the rapid rate that programming is seeing.

Programming (Computer Science) and Software Engineering, are fields that are still in their formative state. Their collective body of knowledge is growing at quite literally an explosive rate. Drawing a comparison between those two related fields can be done, but doesn't serve much purpose in this case.

Work in any of those fields can be very fulfilling. Traditional Engineering tends to be more concrete - you generally can see the results of your work with your own eyes. Programming (CompSci and SE) tends to be more abstract or virtual. It's harder to "see" the results of your work. Don't read too far into that generalization though.

If you're down to picking between Computer Science and Software Engineering, then consider which Universities you are planning on attending and evaluate their programs from there. Long term, I don't believe your career aspects will be impacted that much by picking one degree program versus the other.

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  1. No, the demand for programmers is not going to decrease any time soon. If anything, it will continue to increase.

  2. No, the demand for engineers is not going to decrease any time soon. If anything, it will continue to increase as well.

  3. The salaries are comparable, and both will remain reasonably well paid.