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As Microsoft says (and others have said in the comments), the most common place to use generics is when you want to define an operation on a list of objects, but don't care too much about the specific types of the objects in the list.

The classic example is sorting a list.


One code smell that possibly indicates the use of generics may improve matters is (from Jeff Atwood):

enter image description here

As Microsoft says (and others have said in the comments), the most common place to use generics is when you want to define an operation on a list of objects, but don't care too much about the specific types of the objects in the list.

The classic example is sorting a list.


One code smell that possibly indicates the use of generics is (from Jeff Atwood):

enter image description here

As Microsoft says (and others have said in the comments), the most common place to use generics is when you want to define an operation on a list of objects, but don't care too much about the specific types of the objects in the list.

The classic example is sorting a list.


One code smell that possibly indicates the use of generics may improve matters is (from Jeff Atwood):

enter image description here

2 addition based on question edit
source | link

As Microsoft says (and others have said in the comments), the most common place to use generics is when you want to define an operation on a list of objects, but don't care too much about the specific types of the objects in the list.

The classic example is sorting a list.


One code smell that possibly indicates the use of generics is (from Jeff Atwood):

enter image description here

As Microsoft says (and others have said in the comments), the most common place to use generics is when you want to define an operation on a list of objects, but don't care too much about the specific types of the objects in the list.

The classic example is sorting a list.

As Microsoft says (and others have said in the comments), the most common place to use generics is when you want to define an operation on a list of objects, but don't care too much about the specific types of the objects in the list.

The classic example is sorting a list.


One code smell that possibly indicates the use of generics is (from Jeff Atwood):

enter image description here

1
source | link

As Microsoft says (and others have said in the comments), the most common place to use generics is when you want to define an operation on a list of objects, but don't care too much about the specific types of the objects in the list.

The classic example is sorting a list.