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"Years of experience in X language/platform" is largely a recruitment pathology...

It's open to interpretation and isn't anywhere near as useful as it looks at first glance. As has been said, the Years of Experience Myth is a good read. But also, different people thrive in different cultural environments and modes of work - (eg. Agile and dynamic versus highly organised and stringently engineered, etc).

Also, crucially, the measurement of "years of experience" itself can be very inaccurate. Here's an example from my careercurrent gig: my main task is developing and maintaining a Java web app. However, this runs off a back end which is MFC/C++/SQL Server. Consequently I'm dealing with C++ code on a virtually daily basis too. BUT - this C++ experience is relatively superficial and maintenance-oriented, and I don't really write entire big components or productsprograms from scratch in MFC/C++ anymore (I used to in previous roles though).

Can I still count these last 5 years as "5 years of C++ experience"? Maybe. Maybe not. Depending on how I want to sell it to secure a particular role, I can easily overplay it without outright lying, or I can admit that it wasn't really a 5 solid "years of C++ experience". :) I'm sure plenty of cases out there are similarly open to inaccuracythis kind of measurement"inaccuracy of measurement" problem. Depth of experience can grossly cloud the quality of experience. So an "X amount of time spent with C++" doesn't mean much in itself.

"Years of experience in X language/platform" is largely a recruitment pathology...

It's open to interpretation and isn't anywhere near as useful as it looks at first glance. As has been said, the Years of Experience Myth is a good read. But also, different people thrive in different cultural environments and modes of work - (eg. Agile and dynamic versus highly organised and stringently engineered, etc).

Also, crucially, the measurement of "years of experience" itself can be inaccurate. Here's an example from my career: my main task is developing and maintaining a Java web app. However, this runs off a back end which is MFC/C++/SQL Server. Consequently I'm dealing with C++ code on a virtually daily basis too. BUT - this C++ experience is relatively superficial and maintenance-oriented, and I don't really write entire big components or products from scratch in MFC/C++ anymore.

Can I still count these last 5 years as "5 years of C++ experience"? Maybe. Maybe not. Depending on how I want to sell it to secure a particular role, I can easily overplay it, or I can admit that it wasn't really 5 solid "years of C++ experience". :) I'm sure plenty of cases are similarly open to inaccuracy of measurement.

"Years of experience in X language/platform" is largely a recruitment pathology...

It's open to interpretation and isn't anywhere near as useful as it looks at first glance. As has been said, the Years of Experience Myth is a good read.

Also, crucially, the measurement of "years of experience" itself can be very inaccurate. Here's an example from my current gig: my main task is developing and maintaining a Java web app. However, this runs off a back end which is MFC/C++/SQL Server. Consequently I'm dealing with C++ code on a virtually daily basis too. BUT - this C++ experience is relatively superficial and maintenance-oriented, and I don't really write entire big components or programs from scratch in MFC/C++ anymore (I used to in previous roles though).

Can I still count these last 5 years as "5 years of C++ experience"? Maybe. Maybe not. Depending on how I want to sell it to secure a particular role, I can easily overplay it without outright lying, or I can admit that it wasn't really a 5 solid "years of C++ experience". :) I'm sure plenty of cases out there are similarly open to this kind of "inaccuracy of measurement" problem. Depth of experience can grossly cloud the quality of experience. So an "X amount of time spent with C++" doesn't mean much in itself.

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"Years of experience in X language/platform" is largely a recruitment pathology...

It's open to interpretation and isn't anywhere near as useful as it looks at first glance. As has been said, the Years of Experience Myth is a good read. But also, different people thrive in different cultural environments and modes of work - (eg. Agile and dynamic versus highly organised and stringently engineered, etc).

Also, crucially, the measurement of "years of experience" itself can be inaccurate. Here's an example from my career: my main task is developing and maintaining a Java web app. However, this runs off a back end which is MFC/C++/SQL Server. Consequently I'm dealing with C++ code on a virtually daily basis too. BUT - this C++ experience is relatively superficial and maintenance-oriented, and I don't really write entire big components or products from scratch in MFC/C++ anymore.

Can I still count these last 5 years as "5 years of C++ experience"? Maybe. Maybe not. Depending on how I want to sell it to secure a particular role, I can easily overplay it, or I can admit that it wasn't really 5 solid "years of C++ experience". :) I'm sure plenty of cases are similarly open to inaccuracy of measurement.