2 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
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This is the same as my answer on stackoverflowstackoverflow:

"Dan Pink on the surprising science of motivation" is a TED talk that discusses why we do some of the things we do. You seem to be overly focused on the mastery part of things where you learn how to do something really well and enjoy honing that skill.

Dr. Phil's Life Law captures some of this:

Life Law #3: People do what works. Strategy: Identify the payoffs that drive your behavior and that of others.

Even the most destructive behaviors have a payoff. If you did not perceive the behavior in question to generate some value to you, you would not do it. If you want to stop behaving in a certain way, you've got to stop "paying yourself off" for doing it.

Find and control the payoffs, because you can't stop a behavior until you recognize what you are gaining from it. Payoffs can be as simple as money gained by going to work to psychological payoffs of acceptance, approval, praise, love or companionship. It is possible that you are feeding off unhealthy, addictive and imprisoning payoffs, such as self-punishment or distorted self-importance.

Be alert to the possibility that your behavior is controlled by fear of rejection. It's easier not to change. Try something new or put yourself on the line. Also consider if your need for immediate gratification creates an appetite for a small payoff now rather than a large payoff later.

While overcoming perfectionistic tendencies is part of the solution, another part is understanding the payoff for inaction. Do you fear the new challenges you'd have in writing a book or composing a song? Is there the question of how useful would such a book or song be? At the same time, I'd likely argue you are doing what you like in learning about all this material.

A Strengths Finder blog notes:

My Strengthsfinder 2.0 report said, "People who are especially talented in the Learner theme have a great desire to learn and want to continuously improve. In particular, the process of learning, rather than the outcome, excites them."

People who know me well will confirm this one for you, particularly the part about process versus learning. That's not to say I'm someone who relishes processes themselves, but that I love being in the throes of learning itself.

This learner theme is one of my trifecta of themes that seem to be all parts of one - Input, Intellection and Learner. The seem to all be about information - gathering it, thinking about it, learning more.

This is just to give more perspective here as I have been here many times before and likely will again.

This is the same as my answer on stackoverflow:

"Dan Pink on the surprising science of motivation" is a TED talk that discusses why we do some of the things we do. You seem to be overly focused on the mastery part of things where you learn how to do something really well and enjoy honing that skill.

Dr. Phil's Life Law captures some of this:

Life Law #3: People do what works. Strategy: Identify the payoffs that drive your behavior and that of others.

Even the most destructive behaviors have a payoff. If you did not perceive the behavior in question to generate some value to you, you would not do it. If you want to stop behaving in a certain way, you've got to stop "paying yourself off" for doing it.

Find and control the payoffs, because you can't stop a behavior until you recognize what you are gaining from it. Payoffs can be as simple as money gained by going to work to psychological payoffs of acceptance, approval, praise, love or companionship. It is possible that you are feeding off unhealthy, addictive and imprisoning payoffs, such as self-punishment or distorted self-importance.

Be alert to the possibility that your behavior is controlled by fear of rejection. It's easier not to change. Try something new or put yourself on the line. Also consider if your need for immediate gratification creates an appetite for a small payoff now rather than a large payoff later.

While overcoming perfectionistic tendencies is part of the solution, another part is understanding the payoff for inaction. Do you fear the new challenges you'd have in writing a book or composing a song? Is there the question of how useful would such a book or song be? At the same time, I'd likely argue you are doing what you like in learning about all this material.

A Strengths Finder blog notes:

My Strengthsfinder 2.0 report said, "People who are especially talented in the Learner theme have a great desire to learn and want to continuously improve. In particular, the process of learning, rather than the outcome, excites them."

People who know me well will confirm this one for you, particularly the part about process versus learning. That's not to say I'm someone who relishes processes themselves, but that I love being in the throes of learning itself.

This learner theme is one of my trifecta of themes that seem to be all parts of one - Input, Intellection and Learner. The seem to all be about information - gathering it, thinking about it, learning more.

This is just to give more perspective here as I have been here many times before and likely will again.

This is the same as my answer on stackoverflow:

"Dan Pink on the surprising science of motivation" is a TED talk that discusses why we do some of the things we do. You seem to be overly focused on the mastery part of things where you learn how to do something really well and enjoy honing that skill.

Dr. Phil's Life Law captures some of this:

Life Law #3: People do what works. Strategy: Identify the payoffs that drive your behavior and that of others.

Even the most destructive behaviors have a payoff. If you did not perceive the behavior in question to generate some value to you, you would not do it. If you want to stop behaving in a certain way, you've got to stop "paying yourself off" for doing it.

Find and control the payoffs, because you can't stop a behavior until you recognize what you are gaining from it. Payoffs can be as simple as money gained by going to work to psychological payoffs of acceptance, approval, praise, love or companionship. It is possible that you are feeding off unhealthy, addictive and imprisoning payoffs, such as self-punishment or distorted self-importance.

Be alert to the possibility that your behavior is controlled by fear of rejection. It's easier not to change. Try something new or put yourself on the line. Also consider if your need for immediate gratification creates an appetite for a small payoff now rather than a large payoff later.

While overcoming perfectionistic tendencies is part of the solution, another part is understanding the payoff for inaction. Do you fear the new challenges you'd have in writing a book or composing a song? Is there the question of how useful would such a book or song be? At the same time, I'd likely argue you are doing what you like in learning about all this material.

A Strengths Finder blog notes:

My Strengthsfinder 2.0 report said, "People who are especially talented in the Learner theme have a great desire to learn and want to continuously improve. In particular, the process of learning, rather than the outcome, excites them."

People who know me well will confirm this one for you, particularly the part about process versus learning. That's not to say I'm someone who relishes processes themselves, but that I love being in the throes of learning itself.

This learner theme is one of my trifecta of themes that seem to be all parts of one - Input, Intellection and Learner. The seem to all be about information - gathering it, thinking about it, learning more.

This is just to give more perspective here as I have been here many times before and likely will again.

1
source | link

This is the same as my answer on stackoverflow:

"Dan Pink on the surprising science of motivation" is a TED talk that discusses why we do some of the things we do. You seem to be overly focused on the mastery part of things where you learn how to do something really well and enjoy honing that skill.

Dr. Phil's Life Law captures some of this:

Life Law #3: People do what works. Strategy: Identify the payoffs that drive your behavior and that of others.

Even the most destructive behaviors have a payoff. If you did not perceive the behavior in question to generate some value to you, you would not do it. If you want to stop behaving in a certain way, you've got to stop "paying yourself off" for doing it.

Find and control the payoffs, because you can't stop a behavior until you recognize what you are gaining from it. Payoffs can be as simple as money gained by going to work to psychological payoffs of acceptance, approval, praise, love or companionship. It is possible that you are feeding off unhealthy, addictive and imprisoning payoffs, such as self-punishment or distorted self-importance.

Be alert to the possibility that your behavior is controlled by fear of rejection. It's easier not to change. Try something new or put yourself on the line. Also consider if your need for immediate gratification creates an appetite for a small payoff now rather than a large payoff later.

While overcoming perfectionistic tendencies is part of the solution, another part is understanding the payoff for inaction. Do you fear the new challenges you'd have in writing a book or composing a song? Is there the question of how useful would such a book or song be? At the same time, I'd likely argue you are doing what you like in learning about all this material.

A Strengths Finder blog notes:

My Strengthsfinder 2.0 report said, "People who are especially talented in the Learner theme have a great desire to learn and want to continuously improve. In particular, the process of learning, rather than the outcome, excites them."

People who know me well will confirm this one for you, particularly the part about process versus learning. That's not to say I'm someone who relishes processes themselves, but that I love being in the throes of learning itself.

This learner theme is one of my trifecta of themes that seem to be all parts of one - Input, Intellection and Learner. The seem to all be about information - gathering it, thinking about it, learning more.

This is just to give more perspective here as I have been here many times before and likely will again.