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While Java may not be the or the only viable cross-platform tool, it has some strengths:

  • It's extremely fast.
  • It's extremely robust.
  • It's extremely portable (e.g. bytecode compiled 10 years ago in Windows 95 runs fine in OS X today).

and some weaknesses:

  • Core GUI libraries (Swing...) could be betterare showing their age (3rd party additions help here).
  • The language itself could be less verbose (e.g. checked exceptions...).
  • The startupStartup time could be snappier (although it's improving all the time).

When talking specifically about Java the platform, there's one point more:

  • There are quite a few languages that run on the JVM and interoperate with Java.

While Java may not be the or the only viable cross-platform tool, it has some strengths:

  • It's extremely fast.
  • It's extremely robust.
  • It's extremely portable (e.g. bytecode compiled 10 years ago in Windows 95 runs fine in OS X today).

and some weaknesses:

  • Core GUI libraries (Swing...) could be better (3rd party additions help here).
  • The language itself could be less verbose (e.g. checked exceptions...).
  • The startup time could be snappier (although it's improving all the time).

When talking specifically about Java the platform, there's one point more:

  • There are quite a few languages that run on the JVM and interoperate with Java.

While Java may not be the or the only viable cross-platform tool, it has some strengths:

  • It's extremely fast.
  • It's extremely robust.
  • It's extremely portable (e.g. bytecode compiled 10 years ago in Windows 95 runs fine in OS X today).

and some weaknesses:

  • Core GUI libraries (Swing...) are showing their age (3rd party additions help here).
  • The language itself could be less verbose (e.g. checked exceptions...).
  • Startup time could be snappier (although it's improving all the time).

When talking specifically about Java the platform, there's one point more:

  • There are quite a few languages that run on the JVM and interoperate with Java.
4 added 70 characters in body; deleted 9 characters in body
source | link

While Java may not be the or the only viable cross-platform tool, it has some strengths:

  • It's extremely fast.
  • It's extremely robust.
  • It's extremely portable (e.g. bytecode compiled 10 years ago in Windows 95 runs fine in OS X today).

and some weaknesses:

  • Core GUI libraries (Swing...) could be better (3rd party additions help here).
  • The language itself could be less verbose (e.g. checked exceptions...).
  • The startup time could be snappier (although it's improving all the time).

When talking specifically about Java the platform, there's one point more:

  • There are quite a few languages that run on the JVM and interoperate with Java.

While Java may not be the or the only viable cross-platform tool, it has some strengths:

  • It's extremely fast.
  • It's extremely robust.
  • It's extremely portable (e.g. bytecode compiled 10 years ago in Windows 95 runs fine in OS X today).

and some weaknesses:

  • Core GUI libraries (Swing...) could be better.
  • The language itself could be less verbose.
  • The startup time could be snappier (although it's improving all the time).

When talking specifically about Java the platform, there's one point more:

  • There are quite a few languages that run on the JVM and interoperate with Java.

While Java may not be the or the only viable cross-platform tool, it has some strengths:

  • It's extremely fast.
  • It's extremely robust.
  • It's extremely portable (e.g. bytecode compiled 10 years ago in Windows 95 runs fine in OS X today).

and some weaknesses:

  • Core GUI libraries (Swing...) could be better (3rd party additions help here).
  • The language itself could be less verbose (e.g. checked exceptions...).
  • The startup time could be snappier (although it's improving all the time).

When talking specifically about Java the platform, there's one point more:

  • There are quite a few languages that run on the JVM and interoperate with Java.
3 added 46 characters in body
source | link

While Java may not be the or the only viable cross-platform tool, it has some strengths:

  • It's extremely fast.
  • It's extremely robust.
  • It's extremely portable (e.g. bytecode compiled 10 years ago in Windows 95 runs fine in OS X today).

and some weaknesses:

  • Core GUI libraries (Swing...) could be better.
  • The language itself could be less verbose.
  • The startup time is lengthycould be snappier (although it's improving all the time).

When talking specifically about Java the platform, there's one point more:

  • There are quite a few languages that run on the JVM and interoperate with Java.

While Java may not be the or the only viable cross-platform tool, it has some strengths:

  • It's extremely fast.
  • It's extremely robust.
  • It's extremely portable (e.g. bytecode compiled 10 years ago in Windows 95 runs fine in OS X today).

and some weaknesses:

  • Core GUI libraries (Swing...) could be better.
  • The language itself could be less verbose.
  • The startup time is lengthy.

When talking specifically about Java the platform, there's one point more:

  • There are quite a few languages that run on the JVM and interoperate with Java.

While Java may not be the or the only viable cross-platform tool, it has some strengths:

  • It's extremely fast.
  • It's extremely robust.
  • It's extremely portable (e.g. bytecode compiled 10 years ago in Windows 95 runs fine in OS X today).

and some weaknesses:

  • Core GUI libraries (Swing...) could be better.
  • The language itself could be less verbose.
  • The startup time could be snappier (although it's improving all the time).

When talking specifically about Java the platform, there's one point more:

  • There are quite a few languages that run on the JVM and interoperate with Java.
2 added 47 characters in body; added 73 characters in body; added 3 characters in body
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