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Ok, maybe I projected it a bit too dramatically, but you get the point. The problem is about setting processes/policies in general across all teams in a homogeneous/consistent fashion.

I think that's the problem. Developers don't care (and often for excellent reasons) about consistent or global policies, and want the freedom to do what they think is right rather than comply to corporate policies.

Which is reasonable unless you prove that global processes and measures have value and a positive effect on quality and speed of development.

Usual timeline:

  1. dev: hey, look - I added code coverage metrics to our dashboard, ain't that great?
  2. manager: sure, let's add mandatory goals and compliance on those
  3. dev: never mind, code coverage is stupid and useless, let's drop it

Ok, maybe I projected it a bit too dramatically, but you get the point. The problem is about setting processes/policies in general across all teams in a homogeneous/consistent fashion.

I think that's the problem. Developers don't care (and often for excellent reasons) about consistent or global policies, and want the freedom to do what they think is right rather than comply to corporate policies.

Which is reasonable unless you prove that global processes and measures have value and a positive effect on quality and speed of development.

Ok, maybe I projected it a bit too dramatically, but you get the point. The problem is about setting processes/policies in general across all teams in a homogeneous/consistent fashion.

I think that's the problem. Developers don't care (and often for excellent reasons) about consistent or global policies, and want the freedom to do what they think is right rather than comply to corporate policies.

Which is reasonable unless you prove that global processes and measures have value and a positive effect on quality and speed of development.

Usual timeline:

  1. dev: hey, look - I added code coverage metrics to our dashboard, ain't that great?
  2. manager: sure, let's add mandatory goals and compliance on those
  3. dev: never mind, code coverage is stupid and useless, let's drop it
1
source | link

Ok, maybe I projected it a bit too dramatically, but you get the point. The problem is about setting processes/policies in general across all teams in a homogeneous/consistent fashion.

I think that's the problem. Developers don't care (and often for excellent reasons) about consistent or global policies, and want the freedom to do what they think is right rather than comply to corporate policies.

Which is reasonable unless you prove that global processes and measures have value and a positive effect on quality and speed of development.