Post Reopened by GlenH7, user40980, gnat, Jimmy Hoffa, Jon Purdy
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When comparing floats, what do you call the threshold of difference delta or epsilon?

I'm comparing floats in Java right now and the simplest formula is:

Math.abs(a - b) < THRESHOLD

When naming your variable for the threshold of difference, doshould you name it delta or epsilon, and why? Specifically, what relation does each letter have to a threshold for comparisonwhich of the two is the correct term for the smallest value that a floating-point numbersnumber can represent?

To further clarify, I want to knowIs the etymology behind a naming convention acrossterm programming language specific, or is it universal across languages.?

When comparing floats, do you call the threshold of difference delta or epsilon?

I'm comparing floats in Java right now and the simplest formula is:

Math.abs(a - b) < THRESHOLD

When naming your variable for the threshold of difference, do you name it delta or epsilon, and why? Specifically, what relation does each letter have to a threshold for comparison of floating-point numbers?

To further clarify, I want to know the etymology behind a naming convention across programming languages.

When comparing floats, what do you call the threshold of difference?

I'm comparing floats in Java right now and the simplest formula is:

Math.abs(a - b) < THRESHOLD

When naming your variable for the threshold of difference, should you name it delta or epsilon? Specifically, which of the two is the correct term for the smallest value that a floating-point number can represent?

Is the term programming language specific, or is it universal across languages?

    Post Closed as "primarily opinion-based" by Corbin March, user40980, gnat, Kilian Foth, Robert Harvey
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I'm comparing floats in Java right now and the simplest formula is:

Math.abs(a - b) < THRESHOLD

When naming your variable for the threshold of difference, do you name it delta or epsilon, and why? Specifically, what relation does each letter have to a threshold for comparison of floating-point numbers?

To further clarify, I want to know the etymology behind a naming convention across programming languages. How does that not fit this:

Programmers Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

I'm comparing floats in Java right now and the simplest formula is:

Math.abs(a - b) < THRESHOLD

When naming your variable for the threshold of difference, do you name it delta or epsilon, and why? Specifically, what relation does each letter have to a threshold for comparison of floating-point numbers?

To further clarify, I want to know the etymology behind a naming convention across programming languages. How does that not fit this:

Programmers Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

I'm comparing floats in Java right now and the simplest formula is:

Math.abs(a - b) < THRESHOLD

When naming your variable for the threshold of difference, do you name it delta or epsilon, and why? Specifically, what relation does each letter have to a threshold for comparison of floating-point numbers?

To further clarify, I want to know the etymology behind a naming convention across programming languages.

1
source | link

When comparing floats, do you call the threshold of difference delta or epsilon?

I'm comparing floats in Java right now and the simplest formula is:

Math.abs(a - b) < THRESHOLD

When naming your variable for the threshold of difference, do you name it delta or epsilon, and why? Specifically, what relation does each letter have to a threshold for comparison of floating-point numbers?

To further clarify, I want to know the etymology behind a naming convention across programming languages. How does that not fit this:

Programmers Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.