clarification copied into post from comments // http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/211913/writing-my-problem-solving-approach-on-paper/212487?noredirect=1#comment419231_212487
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gnat
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There is nothing wrong with what you are doing, I learned to program using paper and pen as well.

As others have suggested do what works for you. I remember the first Java program I wrote was mainly on paper and then I spent two hours typing it up and fifteen minutes crying when I saw 200+ compiler errors. There were more but the compiler would only show the first 200! The point I'm making though is that by writing the code on paper I was able to think through the basic algorithm and functionality for what the program needed to do. The compiler pointed out the reasons why my program wouldn't run. 90% of the problems were out of bounds exceptions with arrays.

As you gain more experience and confidence you'll find yourself using pen and paper less. You'll already know how to use basic concepts such as for loops and so on. You'll have examples in other programs, which you can re-use. You'll use the compiler and an IDE to find obvious bugs during the writing of the program. Right now though you don't have that experience.

Reading through your question I wonder if some of your problems might be due to focus. If using a pen and paper in a quiet environment helps you focus then great.

You're still at college and you're still learning. Ultimately, all you're doing is what works for you. If by using paper and pen you are ordering your thoughts and thinking clearly and calmly then you are programming.

As others have suggested do what works for you. I remember the first Java program I wrote was mainly on paper and then I spent two hours typing it up and fifteen minutes crying when I saw 200+ compiler errors. There were more but the compiler would only show the first 200! The point I'm making though is that by writing the code on paper I was able to think through the basic algorithm and functionality for what the program needed to do. The compiler pointed out the reasons why my program wouldn't run. 90% of the problems were out of bounds exceptions with arrays.

As you gain more experience and confidence you'll find yourself using pen and paper less. You'll already know how to use basic concepts such as for loops and so on. You'll have examples in other programs, which you can re-use. You'll use the compiler and an IDE to find obvious bugs during the writing of the program. Right now though you don't have that experience.

Reading through your question I wonder if some of your problems might be due to focus. If using a pen and paper in a quiet environment helps you focus then great.

You're still at college and you're still learning. Ultimately, all you're doing is what works for you. If by using paper and pen you are ordering your thoughts and thinking clearly and calmly then you are programming.

There is nothing wrong with what you are doing, I learned to program using paper and pen as well.

As others have suggested do what works for you. I remember the first Java program I wrote was mainly on paper and then I spent two hours typing it up and fifteen minutes crying when I saw 200+ compiler errors. There were more but the compiler would only show the first 200! The point I'm making though is that by writing the code on paper I was able to think through the basic algorithm and functionality for what the program needed to do. The compiler pointed out the reasons why my program wouldn't run. 90% of the problems were out of bounds exceptions with arrays.

As you gain more experience and confidence you'll find yourself using pen and paper less. You'll already know how to use basic concepts such as for loops and so on. You'll have examples in other programs, which you can re-use. You'll use the compiler and an IDE to find obvious bugs during the writing of the program. Right now though you don't have that experience.

Reading through your question I wonder if some of your problems might be due to focus. If using a pen and paper in a quiet environment helps you focus then great.

You're still at college and you're still learning. Ultimately, all you're doing is what works for you. If by using paper and pen you are ordering your thoughts and thinking clearly and calmly then you are programming.

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As others have suggested do what works for you. I remember the first Java program I wrote was mainly on paper and then I spent two hours typing it up and fifteen minutes crying when I saw 200+ compiler errors. There were more but the compiler would only show the first 200! The point I'm making though is that by writing the code on paper I was able to think through the basic algorithm and functionality for what the program needed to do. The compiler pointed out the reasons why my program wouldn't run. 90% of the problems were out of bounds exceptions with arrays.

As you gain more experience and confidence you'll find yourself using pen and paper less. You'll already know how to use basic concepts such as for loops and so on. You'll have examples in other programs, which you can re-use. You'll use the compiler and an IDE to find obvious bugs during the writing of the program. Right now though you don't have that experience.

Reading through your question I wonder if some of your problems might be due to focus. If using a pen and paper in a quiet environment helps you focus then great.

You're still at college and you're still learning. Ultimately, all you're doing is what works for you. If by using paper and pen you are ordering your thoughts and thinking clearly and calmly then you are programming.