2 Copy edited. Added some context.
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You can pull these changes only if there is an open issue to fix the formatting. Otherwise start your own branch, and if the author sees that more people use your branch simply because it's more readable. They'll merge in the branch on their own, but be prepared to maintain your branch by merging in updates and constantly fixing the formatting.

If the project isn't important enough to you to keep maintaining your own branch, then it wasn't worth cleaning up in the first place.

Pull requests can be taken personally by the author. It's not a mechanism to offering criticism, and reformatting all the code could be taken as criticism.

If you don't want to maintain your own branch, but you want to contribute to a project. Open a new issue and describe why the current format is causing you issues, then offer to resolve the issue for the author. If the author agrees, then they'll assign the issue to you and you now have permission to make a pull request.

You've touched on a subject that I also agree is a rampant problem on githubGitHub. Formatting aside, there are a number of projects that incorrectly use annotationsannotations and that cause havoc with many IDEs. I can think of 3three largely popular projects that use deprecated flags incorrectly that propagate warning messages in my IDE. I've sent pull requests to fix them, but the authors doesn'tdon't use the same IDE, thus the pull requests are ignored.

Branching, merging and fixing seemsseem to be the only solution.

You can pull these changes only if there is an open issue to fix the formatting. Otherwise start your own branch, and if the author sees that more people use your branch simply because it's more readable. They'll merge in the branch on their own, but be prepared to maintain your branch by merging in updates and constantly fixing the formatting.

If the project isn't important enough to you to keep maintaining your own branch, then it wasn't worth cleaning up in the first place.

Pull requests can be taken personally by the author. It's not a mechanism to offering criticism, and reformatting all the code could be taken as criticism.

If you don't want to maintain your own branch, but you want to contribute to a project. Open a new issue and describe why the current format is causing you issues, then offer to resolve the issue for the author. If the author agrees, then they'll assign the issue to you and you now have permission to make a pull request.

You've touched on a subject that I also agree is a rampant problem on github. Formatting aside, there are a number of projects that incorrectly use annotations and that cause havoc with many IDEs. I can think of 3 largely popular projects that use deprecated flags incorrectly that propagate warning messages in my IDE. I've sent pull requests to fix them, but the authors doesn't use the same IDE thus the pull requests are ignored.

Branching, merging and fixing seems to be the only solution.

You can pull these changes only if there is an open issue to fix the formatting. Otherwise start your own branch, and if the author sees that more people use your branch simply because it's more readable. They'll merge in the branch on their own, but be prepared to maintain your branch by merging in updates and constantly fixing the formatting.

If the project isn't important enough to you to keep maintaining your own branch, then it wasn't worth cleaning up in the first place.

Pull requests can be taken personally by the author. It's not a mechanism to offering criticism, and reformatting all the code could be taken as criticism.

If you don't want to maintain your own branch, but you want to contribute to a project. Open a new issue and describe why the current format is causing you issues, then offer to resolve the issue for the author. If the author agrees, then they'll assign the issue to you and you now have permission to make a pull request.

You've touched on a subject that I also agree is a rampant problem on GitHub. Formatting aside, there are a number of projects that incorrectly use annotations and that cause havoc with many IDEs. I can think of three largely popular projects that use deprecated flags incorrectly that propagate warning messages in my IDE. I've sent pull requests to fix them, but the authors don't use the same IDE, thus the pull requests are ignored.

Branching, merging and fixing seem to be the only solution.

1
source | link

You can pull these changes only if there is an open issue to fix the formatting. Otherwise start your own branch, and if the author sees that more people use your branch simply because it's more readable. They'll merge in the branch on their own, but be prepared to maintain your branch by merging in updates and constantly fixing the formatting.

If the project isn't important enough to you to keep maintaining your own branch, then it wasn't worth cleaning up in the first place.

Pull requests can be taken personally by the author. It's not a mechanism to offering criticism, and reformatting all the code could be taken as criticism.

If you don't want to maintain your own branch, but you want to contribute to a project. Open a new issue and describe why the current format is causing you issues, then offer to resolve the issue for the author. If the author agrees, then they'll assign the issue to you and you now have permission to make a pull request.

You've touched on a subject that I also agree is a rampant problem on github. Formatting aside, there are a number of projects that incorrectly use annotations and that cause havoc with many IDEs. I can think of 3 largely popular projects that use deprecated flags incorrectly that propagate warning messages in my IDE. I've sent pull requests to fix them, but the authors doesn't use the same IDE thus the pull requests are ignored.

Branching, merging and fixing seems to be the only solution.