2 replaced http://workplace.stackexchange.com/ with https://workplace.stackexchange.com/
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Pragmatic thinking by Andy Hunt addresses this issue. It refers to the Dreyfus model, according to which there are 5 stages of proficiency in various skills. The novices (stage 1) need precise instructions to be able to do something correctly. Experts (stage 5), on the contrary, can apply general patterns to a given problem. Citing the book,

It’s often difficult for experts to explain their actions to a fine level of detail; many of their responses are so well practiced that they become preconscious actions. Their vast experience is mined by nonverbal, preconscious areas of the brain, which makes it hard for us to observe and hard for them to articulate.

When experts do their thing, it appears almost magical to the rest of us—strange incantations, insight that seems to appear out of nowhere, and a seemingly uncanny ability to know the right answer when the rest of us aren’t even all that sure about the question. It’s not magic, of course, but the way that experts perceive the world, how they problem solve, the mental models they use, and so on, are all markedly different from nonexperts.

This general rule of seeing (and as a result avoiding) different issues can be applied to specifically the issue of accidental complexity. Having a given set of rules isn't enough to avoid this problem. There will always be a situation which isn't covered by those rules. We need to gain experience to be able to foresee problems or identify solutions. Experience is something that cannot be taught, it can only be gained by constant trying, failing or succeeding and learning from mistakes.

This questionThis question from Workplace is relevant and IMHO would be interesting to read in this context.

Pragmatic thinking by Andy Hunt addresses this issue. It refers to the Dreyfus model, according to which there are 5 stages of proficiency in various skills. The novices (stage 1) need precise instructions to be able to do something correctly. Experts (stage 5), on the contrary, can apply general patterns to a given problem. Citing the book,

It’s often difficult for experts to explain their actions to a fine level of detail; many of their responses are so well practiced that they become preconscious actions. Their vast experience is mined by nonverbal, preconscious areas of the brain, which makes it hard for us to observe and hard for them to articulate.

When experts do their thing, it appears almost magical to the rest of us—strange incantations, insight that seems to appear out of nowhere, and a seemingly uncanny ability to know the right answer when the rest of us aren’t even all that sure about the question. It’s not magic, of course, but the way that experts perceive the world, how they problem solve, the mental models they use, and so on, are all markedly different from nonexperts.

This general rule of seeing (and as a result avoiding) different issues can be applied to specifically the issue of accidental complexity. Having a given set of rules isn't enough to avoid this problem. There will always be a situation which isn't covered by those rules. We need to gain experience to be able to foresee problems or identify solutions. Experience is something that cannot be taught, it can only be gained by constant trying, failing or succeeding and learning from mistakes.

This question from Workplace is relevant and IMHO would be interesting to read in this context.

Pragmatic thinking by Andy Hunt addresses this issue. It refers to the Dreyfus model, according to which there are 5 stages of proficiency in various skills. The novices (stage 1) need precise instructions to be able to do something correctly. Experts (stage 5), on the contrary, can apply general patterns to a given problem. Citing the book,

It’s often difficult for experts to explain their actions to a fine level of detail; many of their responses are so well practiced that they become preconscious actions. Their vast experience is mined by nonverbal, preconscious areas of the brain, which makes it hard for us to observe and hard for them to articulate.

When experts do their thing, it appears almost magical to the rest of us—strange incantations, insight that seems to appear out of nowhere, and a seemingly uncanny ability to know the right answer when the rest of us aren’t even all that sure about the question. It’s not magic, of course, but the way that experts perceive the world, how they problem solve, the mental models they use, and so on, are all markedly different from nonexperts.

This general rule of seeing (and as a result avoiding) different issues can be applied to specifically the issue of accidental complexity. Having a given set of rules isn't enough to avoid this problem. There will always be a situation which isn't covered by those rules. We need to gain experience to be able to foresee problems or identify solutions. Experience is something that cannot be taught, it can only be gained by constant trying, failing or succeeding and learning from mistakes.

This question from Workplace is relevant and IMHO would be interesting to read in this context.

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Pragmatic thinking by Andy Hunt addresses this issue. It refers to the Dreyfus model, according to which there are 5 stages of proficiency in various skills. The novices (stage 1) need precise instructions to be able to do something correctly. Experts (stage 5), on the contrary, can apply general patterns to a given problem. Citing the book,

It’s often difficult for experts to explain their actions to a fine level of detail; many of their responses are so well practiced that they become preconscious actions. Their vast experience is mined by nonverbal, preconscious areas of the brain, which makes it hard for us to observe and hard for them to articulate.

When experts do their thing, it appears almost magical to the rest of us—strange incantations, insight that seems to appear out of nowhere, and a seemingly uncanny ability to know the right answer when the rest of us aren’t even all that sure about the question. It’s not magic, of course, but the way that experts perceive the world, how they problem solve, the mental models they use, and so on, are all markedly different from nonexperts.

This general rule of seeing (and as a result avoiding) different issues can be applied to specifically the issue of accidental complexity. Having a given set of rules isn't enough to avoid this problem. There will always be a situation which isn't covered by those rules. We need to gain experience to be able to foresee problems or identify solutions. Experience is something that cannot be taught, it can only be gained by constant trying, failing or succeeding and learning from mistakes.

This question from Workplace is relevant and IMHO would be interesting to read in this context.