3 spring -> sprint
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INVEST is a good mnemonic to use for measuring the quality of your stories and getting better at writing them. The mnemonic states that a good story should be:

  • Independent: The user story should be self-contained, in a way that there is no inherent dependency on another user story.
  • Negotiable: User stories, up until they are part of an iteration, can always be changed and rewritten.
  • Valuable: A user story must deliver value to the end user.
  • Estimable: You must always be able to estimate the size of a user story.
  • Small: User stories should not be so big as to become impossible to plan/task/prioritize with a certain level of certainty.
  • Testable: The user story or its related description must provide the necessary information to make test development possible

You should also invest time in backlog grooming sessions. These should be well in advance before the sprint planning. Here you improve the stories, find out if you need more information. In sprint planning, you should refuse to take on stories that are too vague. For this evaluation you can use the above mentioned INVEST.

Often I found myself breaking a story in two stories: the first one contains the clear must-have parts and second the more vague or "nice-to-have" features. The first one is accepted to the next springsprint and the second is groomed during that sprint with new information gathered from stakeholders and from implementing the first part.

INVEST is a good mnemonic to use for measuring the quality of your stories and getting better at writing them. The mnemonic states that a good story should be:

  • Independent: The user story should be self-contained, in a way that there is no inherent dependency on another user story.
  • Negotiable: User stories, up until they are part of an iteration, can always be changed and rewritten.
  • Valuable: A user story must deliver value to the end user.
  • Estimable: You must always be able to estimate the size of a user story.
  • Small: User stories should not be so big as to become impossible to plan/task/prioritize with a certain level of certainty.
  • Testable: The user story or its related description must provide the necessary information to make test development possible

You should also invest time in backlog grooming sessions. These should be well in advance before the sprint planning. Here you improve the stories, find out if you need more information. In sprint planning, you should refuse to take on stories that are too vague. For this evaluation you can use the above mentioned INVEST.

Often I found myself breaking a story in two stories: the first one contains the clear must-have parts and second the more vague or "nice-to-have" features. The first one is accepted to the next spring and the second is groomed during that sprint with new information gathered from stakeholders and from implementing the first part.

INVEST is a good mnemonic to use for measuring the quality of your stories and getting better at writing them. The mnemonic states that a good story should be:

  • Independent: The user story should be self-contained, in a way that there is no inherent dependency on another user story.
  • Negotiable: User stories, up until they are part of an iteration, can always be changed and rewritten.
  • Valuable: A user story must deliver value to the end user.
  • Estimable: You must always be able to estimate the size of a user story.
  • Small: User stories should not be so big as to become impossible to plan/task/prioritize with a certain level of certainty.
  • Testable: The user story or its related description must provide the necessary information to make test development possible

You should also invest time in backlog grooming sessions. These should be well in advance before the sprint planning. Here you improve the stories, find out if you need more information. In sprint planning, you should refuse to take on stories that are too vague. For this evaluation you can use the above mentioned INVEST.

Often I found myself breaking a story in two stories: the first one contains the clear must-have parts and second the more vague or "nice-to-have" features. The first one is accepted to the next sprint and the second is groomed during that sprint with new information gathered from stakeholders and from implementing the first part.

2 elaborated on the meaning of INVEST so answer doesn't require checking the link
source | link

INVEST is a good mnemonic to use for measuring the quality of your stories and getting better at writing them. The mnemonic states that a good story should be:

  • Independent: The user story should be self-contained, in a way that there is no inherent dependency on another user story.
  • Negotiable: User stories, up until they are part of an iteration, can always be changed and rewritten.
  • Valuable: A user story must deliver value to the end user.
  • Estimable: You must always be able to estimate the size of a user story.
  • Small: User stories should not be so big as to become impossible to plan/task/prioritize with a certain level of certainty.
  • Testable: The user story or its related description must provide the necessary information to make test development possible

You should also invest time in backlog grooming sessions. These should be well in advance before the sprint planning. Here you improve the stories, find out if you need more information. In sprint planning, you should refuse to take on stories that are too vague. For this evaluation you can use the above mentioned INVEST.

Often I found myself breaking a story in two stories: the first one contains the clear must-have parts and second the more vague or "nice-to-have" features. The first one is accepted to the next spring and the second is groomed during that sprint with new information gathered from stakeholders and from implementing the first part.

INVEST is a good mnemonic to use for measuring the quality of your stories and getting better at writing them.

You should also invest time in backlog grooming sessions. These should be well in advance before the sprint planning. Here you improve the stories, find out if you need more information. In sprint planning, you should refuse to take on stories that are too vague. For this evaluation you can use the above mentioned INVEST.

Often I found myself breaking a story in two stories: the first one contains the clear must-have parts and second the more vague or "nice-to-have" features. The first one is accepted to the next spring and the second is groomed during that sprint with new information gathered from stakeholders and from implementing the first part.

INVEST is a good mnemonic to use for measuring the quality of your stories and getting better at writing them. The mnemonic states that a good story should be:

  • Independent: The user story should be self-contained, in a way that there is no inherent dependency on another user story.
  • Negotiable: User stories, up until they are part of an iteration, can always be changed and rewritten.
  • Valuable: A user story must deliver value to the end user.
  • Estimable: You must always be able to estimate the size of a user story.
  • Small: User stories should not be so big as to become impossible to plan/task/prioritize with a certain level of certainty.
  • Testable: The user story or its related description must provide the necessary information to make test development possible

You should also invest time in backlog grooming sessions. These should be well in advance before the sprint planning. Here you improve the stories, find out if you need more information. In sprint planning, you should refuse to take on stories that are too vague. For this evaluation you can use the above mentioned INVEST.

Often I found myself breaking a story in two stories: the first one contains the clear must-have parts and second the more vague or "nice-to-have" features. The first one is accepted to the next spring and the second is groomed during that sprint with new information gathered from stakeholders and from implementing the first part.

1
source | link

INVEST is a good mnemonic to use for measuring the quality of your stories and getting better at writing them.

You should also invest time in backlog grooming sessions. These should be well in advance before the sprint planning. Here you improve the stories, find out if you need more information. In sprint planning, you should refuse to take on stories that are too vague. For this evaluation you can use the above mentioned INVEST.

Often I found myself breaking a story in two stories: the first one contains the clear must-have parts and second the more vague or "nice-to-have" features. The first one is accepted to the next spring and the second is groomed during that sprint with new information gathered from stakeholders and from implementing the first part.