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is this just a feature to bring C programmers in town

It is surely a feature "to bring C (or C++) programmers in town", but using the word "just" here underestimates the value of such a similarity.

  • it makes code (or at least code snippets) easier to port from C (or C++) to Java or C#

  • i++ is less to type than i += 1, and x[i++]=0; is much more idiomatic than x[i]=0;i+=1;

And yes, code which heavily uses post/pre increment operators maybe hard to read and maintain, but for any code where these operators are misused, I would not expect a drastic increase in code quality even when the language would not provide these operators. That's because if you have devs which don't care for maintainability, they will always find ways to write hard-to-understand code.

Related: Is there any difference between the Java and C++ operators?Is there any difference between the Java and C++ operators? From this answer one can deduce that any well-defined operator behaviour in C is similar in Java, and Java does only add some definitions for operator precedence where C has undefined behaviour. This does not look like coincidence, it seems to be pretty intentional.

is this just a feature to bring C programmers in town

It is surely a feature "to bring C (or C++) programmers in town", but using the word "just" here underestimates the value of such a similarity.

  • it makes code (or at least code snippets) easier to port from C (or C++) to Java or C#

  • i++ is less to type than i += 1, and x[i++]=0; is much more idiomatic than x[i]=0;i+=1;

And yes, code which heavily uses post/pre increment operators maybe hard to read and maintain, but for any code where these operators are misused, I would not expect a drastic increase in code quality even when the language would not provide these operators. That's because if you have devs which don't care for maintainability, they will always find ways to write hard-to-understand code.

Related: Is there any difference between the Java and C++ operators? From this answer one can deduce that any well-defined operator behaviour in C is similar in Java, and Java does only add some definitions for operator precedence where C has undefined behaviour. This does not look like coincidence, it seems to be pretty intentional.

is this just a feature to bring C programmers in town

It is surely a feature "to bring C (or C++) programmers in town", but using the word "just" here underestimates the value of such a similarity.

  • it makes code (or at least code snippets) easier to port from C (or C++) to Java or C#

  • i++ is less to type than i += 1, and x[i++]=0; is much more idiomatic than x[i]=0;i+=1;

And yes, code which heavily uses post/pre increment operators maybe hard to read and maintain, but for any code where these operators are misused, I would not expect a drastic increase in code quality even when the language would not provide these operators. That's because if you have devs which don't care for maintainability, they will always find ways to write hard-to-understand code.

Related: Is there any difference between the Java and C++ operators? From this answer one can deduce that any well-defined operator behaviour in C is similar in Java, and Java does only add some definitions for operator precedence where C has undefined behaviour. This does not look like coincidence, it seems to be pretty intentional.

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is this just a feature to bring C programmers in town

It is surely a feature "to bring C (or C++) programmers in town", but using the word "just" here underestimates the value of such a similarity.

  • it makes code (or at least code snippets) easier to port from C (or C++) to Java or C#

  • i++ is less to type than i += 1, and x[i++]=0; is much more idiomatic than x[i]=0;i+=1;

And yes, code which heavily uses post/pre increment operators maybe hard to read and maintain, but for any code where these operators are misused, I would not expect a drastic increase in code quality even when the language would not provide these operators. That's because if you have devs which don't care for maintainability, they will always find ways to write hard-to-understand code.

Related: Is there any difference between the Java and C++ operators? From this answer one can deduce that any well-defined operator behaviour in C is similar in Java, and Java does only add some definitions for operator precedence where C is has undefined behaviour. This does not look like coincidence, it seems to be pretty intentional.

is this just a feature to bring C programmers in town

It is surely a feature "to bring C (or C++) programmers in town", but using the word "just" here underestimates the value of such a similarity.

  • it makes code (or at least code snippets) easier to port from C (or C++) to Java or C#

  • i++ is less to type than i += 1, and x[i++]=0; is much more idiomatic than x[i]=0;i+=1;

And yes, code which heavily uses post/pre increment operators maybe hard to read and maintain, but for any code where these operators are misused, I would not expect a drastic increase in code quality even when the language would not provide these operators. That's because if you have devs which don't care for maintainability, they will always find ways to write hard-to-understand code.

Related: Is there any difference between the Java and C++ operators? From this answer one can deduce that any well-defined operator behaviour in C is similar in Java, and Java does only add some definitions for operator precedence where C is has undefined behaviour. This does not look like coincidence, it seems to be pretty intentional.

is this just a feature to bring C programmers in town

It is surely a feature "to bring C (or C++) programmers in town", but using the word "just" here underestimates the value of such a similarity.

  • it makes code (or at least code snippets) easier to port from C (or C++) to Java or C#

  • i++ is less to type than i += 1, and x[i++]=0; is much more idiomatic than x[i]=0;i+=1;

And yes, code which heavily uses post/pre increment operators maybe hard to read and maintain, but for any code where these operators are misused, I would not expect a drastic increase in code quality even when the language would not provide these operators. That's because if you have devs which don't care for maintainability, they will always find ways to write hard-to-understand code.

Related: Is there any difference between the Java and C++ operators? From this answer one can deduce that any well-defined operator behaviour in C is similar in Java, and Java does only add some definitions for operator precedence where C has undefined behaviour. This does not look like coincidence, it seems to be pretty intentional.

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is this just a feature to bring C programmers in town

It is surely a feature "to bring C (or C++) programmers in town", but using the word "just" here underestimates the value of such a similarity.

  • it makes code (or at least code snippets) easier to port from C (or C++) to Java or C#

  • i++ is less to type than i += 1, and x[i++]=0; is much more idiomatic than x[i]=0;i+=1;

And yes, code which heavily uses post/pre increment operators maybe hard to read and maintain, but for any code where these operators are misused, I would not expect a drastic increase in code quality even when the language would not provide these operators. That's because if you have devs which don't care for maintainability, they will always find ways to write hard-to-understand code.

Related: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6623888/is-there-any-difference-between-the-java-and-c-operatorsIs there any difference between the Java and C++ operators?. From this answer one can deduce that any well-defined operator behaviour in C is similar in Java, and Java does only add some definitions for operator precedence where C is has undefined behaviour. This does not look like coincidence, it seems to be pretty intentional.

is this just a feature to bring C programmers in town

It is surely a feature "to bring C (or C++) programmers in town", but using the word "just" here underestimates the value of such a similarity.

  • it makes code (or at least code snippets) easier to port from C (or C++) to Java or C#

  • i++ is less to type than i += 1, and x[i++]=0; is much more idiomatic than x[i]=0;i+=1;

And yes, code which heavily uses post/pre increment operators maybe hard to read and maintain, but for any code where these operators are misused, I would not expect a drastic increase in code quality even when the language would not provide these operators. That's because if you have devs which don't care for maintainability, they will always find ways to write hard-to-understand code.

Related: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6623888/is-there-any-difference-between-the-java-and-c-operators. From this answer one can deduce that any well-defined operator behaviour in C is similar in Java, and Java does only add some definitions for operator precedence where C is has undefined behaviour. This does not look like coincidence, it seems to be pretty intentional.

is this just a feature to bring C programmers in town

It is surely a feature "to bring C (or C++) programmers in town", but using the word "just" here underestimates the value of such a similarity.

  • it makes code (or at least code snippets) easier to port from C (or C++) to Java or C#

  • i++ is less to type than i += 1, and x[i++]=0; is much more idiomatic than x[i]=0;i+=1;

And yes, code which heavily uses post/pre increment operators maybe hard to read and maintain, but for any code where these operators are misused, I would not expect a drastic increase in code quality even when the language would not provide these operators. That's because if you have devs which don't care for maintainability, they will always find ways to write hard-to-understand code.

Related: Is there any difference between the Java and C++ operators? From this answer one can deduce that any well-defined operator behaviour in C is similar in Java, and Java does only add some definitions for operator precedence where C is has undefined behaviour. This does not look like coincidence, it seems to be pretty intentional.

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