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The short answer: When you fork an existing project, you generally do not have permission to change the license nor do you get copyright on the code you copied over.

You do have the copyright on any (nontrivial) modifications or additions that you make.


The long answer:

The only ways to get copyright on a piece of code is by writing it yourself or by contractually getting the copyright assigned to you. This means that forking an existing project doesn't change the copyrights on the code of either the original project or the fork.

The only people who can change a copyright license are the holders of that copyright. If there are multiple copyright holders to the code of a project, then all copyright holders must agree to a change in the copyright license. This means that you don't have permission to change the license of your fork (not even to dual license it), unless that right is explicitly given to you in the existing copyright license explicitly gives you the right to sublicense the code.

The short answer: When you fork an existing project, you do not have permission to change the license nor do you get copyright on the code you copied over.


The long answer:

The only ways to get copyright on a piece of code is by writing it yourself or by contractually getting the copyright assigned to you. This means that forking an existing project doesn't change the copyrights on the code of either the original project or the fork.

The only people who can change a copyright license are the holders of that copyright. If there are multiple copyright holders to the code of a project, then all copyright holders must agree to a change in the copyright license. This means that you don't have permission to change the license of your fork (not even to dual license it), unless that right is explicitly given to you in the copyright license.

The short answer: When you fork an existing project, you generally do not have permission to change the license nor do you get copyright on the code you copied over.

You do have the copyright on any (nontrivial) modifications or additions that you make.


The long answer:

The only ways to get copyright on a piece of code is by writing it yourself or by contractually getting the copyright assigned to you. This means that forking an existing project doesn't change the copyrights on the code of either the original project or the fork.

The only people who can change a copyright license are the holders of that copyright. If there are multiple copyright holders to the code of a project, then all copyright holders must agree to a change in the copyright license. This means that you don't have permission to change the license of your fork (not even to dual license it), unless the existing copyright license explicitly gives you the right to sublicense the code.

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source | link

The short answer: When you fork an existing project, you do not have permission to change the license nor do you get copyright on the code you copied over.


The long answer:

The only ways to get copyright on a piece of code is by writing it yourself or by contractually getting the copyright assigned to you. This means that forking an existing project doesn't change the copyrights on the code of either the original project or the fork.

The only people who can change a copyright license are the holders of that copyright. If there are multiple copyright holders to the code of a project, then all copyright holders must agree to a change in the copyright license. This means that you don't have permission to change the license of your fork (not even to dual license it), unless that right is explicitly given to you in the copyright license.