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Use Case - Formal specification of interaction between actor(s) and a system that realize one single functional requirement of this system (part of UML).

User Story - Informal description of a function of a system (Agile term).

User Requirement - Formal description of what user expects from the system usually gathered/formulated on very early stage of the development process by an architect in close cooperation with the client. There are two main types of requirements:

  1. FunctionalFunctional - requirements that are translated to use cases or user stories and then implemented in business logic of the application.
  2. Non-functionalNon-functional - requirements that (in most cases) should be ensured by the architecture of the system. It's very important that all non-functional requirements are formulated in measurable way, so they can be tested.

It makes less sense to compare User Requirements to User Stories or Use Cases, because requirements serve very different purpose. Use Cases and User Stories describe details of a function in the system, while User Requirements state functions and non-functional properties of the system (unambiguously but without any detail).

Use Case - Formal specification of interaction between actor(s) and a system that realize one single functional requirement of this system (part of UML).

User Story - Informal description of a function of a system (Agile term).

User Requirement - Formal description of what user expects from the system usually gathered/formulated on very early stage of the development process by an architect in close cooperation with the client. There are two main types of requirements:

  1. Functional - requirements that are translated to use cases or user stories and then implemented in business logic of the application.
  2. Non-functional - requirements that (in most cases) should be ensured by the architecture of the system. It's very important that all non-functional requirements are formulated in measurable way, so they can be tested.

It makes less sense to compare User Requirements to User Stories or Use Cases, because requirements serve very different purpose. Use Cases and User Stories describe details of a function in the system, while User Requirements state functions and non-functional properties of the system (unambiguously but without any detail).

Use Case - Formal specification of interaction between actor(s) and a system that realize one single functional requirement of this system (part of UML).

User Story - Informal description of a function of a system (Agile term).

User Requirement - Formal description of what user expects from the system usually gathered/formulated on very early stage of the development process by an architect in close cooperation with the client. There are two main types of requirements:

  1. Functional - requirements that are translated to use cases or user stories and then implemented in business logic of the application.
  2. Non-functional - requirements that (in most cases) should be ensured by the architecture of the system. It's very important that all non-functional requirements are formulated in measurable way, so they can be tested.

It makes less sense to compare User Requirements to User Stories or Use Cases, because requirements serve very different purpose. Use Cases and User Stories describe details of a function in the system, while User Requirements state functions and non-functional properties of the system (unambiguously but without any detail).

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source | link

Use Case - Formal specification of interaction between actor(s) and a system that realize one single functional requirement of this system (part of UML).

User Story - Informal description of a function of a system (Agile term).

User Requirement - Formal description of what user expects from the system usually gathered/formulated on very early stage of the development process by an architect in close cooperation with the client. There are two main types of requirements:

  1. Functional - requirements that are translated to use cases or user stories and then implemented in business logic of the application.
  2. Non-functional - requirements that (in most cases) should be ensured by the architecture of the system. It's very important that all non-functional requirements are formulated in measurable way, so they can be tested.

It makes less sense to compare User Requirements to User Stories or Use Cases, because requirements serve very different purpose. Use Cases and User Stories describe details of a function in the system, while User Requirements state functions and non-functional properties of the system (unambiguously but without any detail).

Use Case - Formal specification of interaction between actor(s) and a system that realize one single functional requirement of this system (part of UML).

User Story - Informal description of a function of a system (Agile term).

User Requirement - Formal description of what user expects from the system. There are two main types of requirements:

  1. Functional - requirements that are translated to use cases or user stories and then implemented in business logic of the application.
  2. Non-functional - requirements that (in most cases) should be ensured by the architecture of the system. It's very important that all non-functional requirements are formulated in measurable way, so they can be tested.

Use Case - Formal specification of interaction between actor(s) and a system that realize one single functional requirement of this system (part of UML).

User Story - Informal description of a function of a system (Agile term).

User Requirement - Formal description of what user expects from the system usually gathered/formulated on very early stage of the development process by an architect in close cooperation with the client. There are two main types of requirements:

  1. Functional - requirements that are translated to use cases or user stories and then implemented in business logic of the application.
  2. Non-functional - requirements that (in most cases) should be ensured by the architecture of the system. It's very important that all non-functional requirements are formulated in measurable way, so they can be tested.

It makes less sense to compare User Requirements to User Stories or Use Cases, because requirements serve very different purpose. Use Cases and User Stories describe details of a function in the system, while User Requirements state functions and non-functional properties of the system (unambiguously but without any detail).

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source | link

Use Case - Formal specification of interaction between actor(s) and a system that realize one single functional requirement of this system (part of UML).

User Story - Informal description of a function of a system (Agile term).

User Requirement - Formal description of what user expects from the system. There are two main types of requirements:

  1. Functional - requirements that are translated to use cases or user stories and then implemented in business logic of the application.
  2. Non-functional - requirements that (in most cases) should be ensured by the architecture of the system. It's very important that all non-functional requirements are formulated in measurable way, so they can be tested.