4 replaced http://programmers.stackexchange.com/ with https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/
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It seems you are:

  1. Trying stuff out to find the best approach (experimenting, incremental design)
  2. Rewriting code to get it cleaner (refactoring)
  3. Constantly writing tests (test driven development)

What you are doing is awesome! It looks like you are doing it perfectly right, especially if you've figured it out by yourself and not learned it from an (agile) programming book. There is obviously more to this but you've got the values nailed. Just remember to refactor and improve the design while you are adding code and there should be no need for a BDUF.

Have you considered focusing on one small feature at a timeone small feature at a time, and release after each feature is completed? That might help you get unstuck from any analysis problem you are struggling with and demonstrates real progress to you employer.

Also, I don't know what "professional development community" you are talking about, but if were you, I'd tell them to go back to their ivory towers so you can get on with your work!

It seems you are:

  1. Trying stuff out to find the best approach (experimenting, incremental design)
  2. Rewriting code to get it cleaner (refactoring)
  3. Constantly writing tests (test driven development)

What you are doing is awesome! It looks like you are doing it perfectly right, especially if you've figured it out by yourself and not learned it from an (agile) programming book. There is obviously more to this but you've got the values nailed. Just remember to refactor and improve the design while you are adding code and there should be no need for a BDUF.

Have you considered focusing on one small feature at a time, and release after each feature is completed? That might help you get unstuck from any analysis problem you are struggling with and demonstrates real progress to you employer.

Also, I don't know what "professional development community" you are talking about, but if were you, I'd tell them to go back to their ivory towers so you can get on with your work!

It seems you are:

  1. Trying stuff out to find the best approach (experimenting, incremental design)
  2. Rewriting code to get it cleaner (refactoring)
  3. Constantly writing tests (test driven development)

What you are doing is awesome! It looks like you are doing it perfectly right, especially if you've figured it out by yourself and not learned it from an (agile) programming book. There is obviously more to this but you've got the values nailed. Just remember to refactor and improve the design while you are adding code and there should be no need for a BDUF.

Have you considered focusing on one small feature at a time, and release after each feature is completed? That might help you get unstuck from any analysis problem you are struggling with and demonstrates real progress to you employer.

Also, I don't know what "professional development community" you are talking about, but if were you, I'd tell them to go back to their ivory towers so you can get on with your work!

3 added 117 characters in body
source | link

It seems you are:

  1. Trying stuff out to find the best approach (experimenting, incremental design)
  2. Rewriting code to get it cleaner (refactoring)
  3. Constantly writing tests (test driven development)

What you are doing is awesome! It looks like you are doing it perfectly right, especially if you've figured it out by yourself and not learned it from an (agile) programming book. There is obviously more to this but you've got the values nailed, which is more than I can say about most programmers. Just remember to refactor and improve the design while you are adding code and there should be no need for a BDUF.

Anyway, haveHave you considered focusing on one small feature at a time, and release after each feature is completed? That might help you get unstuck from any analysis problem you are struggling with and demonstrates real progress to you employer.

Also, I don't know what "professional development community" you are talking about, but if were you, I'd tell them to go back to their ivory towers and let meso you can get on with myyour work!

It seems you are:

  1. Trying stuff out to find the best approach (experimenting, incremental design)
  2. Rewriting code to get it cleaner (refactoring)
  3. Constantly writing tests (test driven development)

What you are doing is awesome! It looks like you are doing it perfectly right, especially if you've figured it out by yourself and not learned it from an (agile) programming book. There is obviously more to this but you've got the values nailed, which is more than I can say about most programmers.

Anyway, have you considered focusing on one small feature at a time, and release after each feature is completed? That might help you get unstuck from any analysis problem you are struggling with and demonstrates real progress to you employer.

Also, I don't know what "professional development community" you are talking about, but if were you, I'd tell them to go back to their ivory towers and let me get on with my work!

It seems you are:

  1. Trying stuff out to find the best approach (experimenting, incremental design)
  2. Rewriting code to get it cleaner (refactoring)
  3. Constantly writing tests (test driven development)

What you are doing is awesome! It looks like you are doing it perfectly right, especially if you've figured it out by yourself and not learned it from an (agile) programming book. There is obviously more to this but you've got the values nailed. Just remember to refactor and improve the design while you are adding code and there should be no need for a BDUF.

Have you considered focusing on one small feature at a time, and release after each feature is completed? That might help you get unstuck from any analysis problem you are struggling with and demonstrates real progress to you employer.

Also, I don't know what "professional development community" you are talking about, but if were you, I'd tell them to go back to their ivory towers so you can get on with your work!

2 added 495 characters in body
source | link

It seems you are:

  1. Trying stuff out to find the best approach (experimenting, incremental design)
  2. Rewriting code to get it cleaner (refactoring)
  3. Constantly writing tests (test driven development)

What you are doing is awesome! It looks like you are doing it perfectly right, especially if you've figured it out by yourself and not learned it from an (agile) programming book. There is obviously more to this but you've got the values nailed, which is more than I can say about most programmers.

Anyway, have you considered focusing on one small feature at a time, and release after each feature is completed? That might help you get unstuck from any analysis problem you are struggling with and demonstrates real progress to you employer.

Also, I don't know what "professional development community" you are referring totalking about, but if were you, I'd tell them to go back to their ivory towers and let me get on with my work!

It seems you are:

  1. Trying stuff out to find the best approach (experimenting, incremental design)
  2. Rewriting code to get it cleaner (refactoring)
  3. Constantly writing tests (test driven development)

What you are doing is awesome! It looks like you are doing it perfectly right, especially if you've figured it out by yourself and not learned it from an (agile) programming book.

I don't know what "professional development community" you are referring to, but if were you, I'd tell them to go back to their ivory towers and let me get on with my work!

It seems you are:

  1. Trying stuff out to find the best approach (experimenting, incremental design)
  2. Rewriting code to get it cleaner (refactoring)
  3. Constantly writing tests (test driven development)

What you are doing is awesome! It looks like you are doing it perfectly right, especially if you've figured it out by yourself and not learned it from an (agile) programming book. There is obviously more to this but you've got the values nailed, which is more than I can say about most programmers.

Anyway, have you considered focusing on one small feature at a time, and release after each feature is completed? That might help you get unstuck from any analysis problem you are struggling with and demonstrates real progress to you employer.

Also, I don't know what "professional development community" you are talking about, but if were you, I'd tell them to go back to their ivory towers and let me get on with my work!

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