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In the case of inexperienced programmers/database designers, it's because of not knowing. They tend to reinvent the wheel because they don't know a group of people spanning industries, already discussed the issue and came up with an standard approved by all who participated, often after very long discussions, revisions, etc. Recently a co-worker of mine showed incredulity when I told him there was an ISO standard regarding whether a given week is considered the last week of a year or the first one of the next year (ISO 8601). He didn't believe a standard existed regarding something so specific. I told him that the correctness of many applications depended on that standard.

In the case of experienced programmers/database designers, it's disregard caused by "knowing better", not-invented-here syndrome, and/or grandiosity. They don't trust ISO or any other standard bodies because they consider the ISO code is "not stable enough", meaning it will change someday. So they create their own, invented-here or auto incremented codes/identifiers hindering interoperability, which they also disregard. See this similar questionquestion, albeight database-design inclined. They give reasons like:

I may not necessarily want my database design to depend on a bunch of third parties (IATA, ISO), regardless of how stable their standards are. Or, I may not want to depend on a particular standard at all.

enter image description here

Oddly enough those who disregard standards use standard USB ports, buy standard-sized DVDs and BluRays and drive cars with tires that conform to standards.

In the case of inexperienced programmers/database designers, it's because of not knowing. They tend to reinvent the wheel because they don't know a group of people spanning industries, already discussed the issue and came up with an standard approved by all who participated, often after very long discussions, revisions, etc. Recently a co-worker of mine showed incredulity when I told him there was an ISO standard regarding whether a given week is considered the last week of a year or the first one of the next year (ISO 8601). He didn't believe a standard existed regarding something so specific. I told him that the correctness of many applications depended on that standard.

In the case of experienced programmers/database designers, it's disregard caused by "knowing better", not-invented-here syndrome, and/or grandiosity. They don't trust ISO or any other standard bodies because they consider the ISO code is "not stable enough", meaning it will change someday. So they create their own, invented-here or auto incremented codes/identifiers hindering interoperability, which they also disregard. See this similar question, albeight database-design inclined. They give reasons like:

I may not necessarily want my database design to depend on a bunch of third parties (IATA, ISO), regardless of how stable their standards are. Or, I may not want to depend on a particular standard at all.

enter image description here

Oddly enough those who disregard standards use standard USB ports, buy standard-sized DVDs and BluRays and drive cars with tires that conform to standards.

In the case of inexperienced programmers/database designers, it's because of not knowing. They tend to reinvent the wheel because they don't know a group of people spanning industries, already discussed the issue and came up with an standard approved by all who participated, often after very long discussions, revisions, etc. Recently a co-worker of mine showed incredulity when I told him there was an ISO standard regarding whether a given week is considered the last week of a year or the first one of the next year (ISO 8601). He didn't believe a standard existed regarding something so specific. I told him that the correctness of many applications depended on that standard.

In the case of experienced programmers/database designers, it's disregard caused by "knowing better", not-invented-here syndrome, and/or grandiosity. They don't trust ISO or any other standard bodies because they consider the ISO code is "not stable enough", meaning it will change someday. So they create their own, invented-here or auto incremented codes/identifiers hindering interoperability, which they also disregard. See this similar question, albeight database-design inclined. They give reasons like:

I may not necessarily want my database design to depend on a bunch of third parties (IATA, ISO), regardless of how stable their standards are. Or, I may not want to depend on a particular standard at all.

enter image description here

Oddly enough those who disregard standards use standard USB ports, buy standard-sized DVDs and BluRays and drive cars with tires that conform to standards.

4 added 8 characters in body
source | link

In the case of inexperienced programmers/database designers, it's because of not knowing. They tend to reinvent the wheel because they don't know a group of people spanning industries, already discussed the issue and came up with an standard approved by all who participated, often after very long discussions, revisions, etc. Recently a co-worker of mine showed incredulity when I told him there was an ISO standard regarding whether a given week is considered the last week of a year or the first one of the next year (ISO 8601). He didn't believe a standard existed regarding something so specific. I told him that the correctness of many applications depended on that standard.

In the case of experienced programmers/database designers, it's disregard caused by "knowing better", not-invented-here syndrome, and/or grandiosity. They don't trust ISO or any other standard bodies because they consider the ISO code is "not stable enough", meaning it will change someday. So they create their own, invented-here or auto incremented codes/identifiers hindering interoperability, which they also disregard. See this similar question, albeight database-design inclined. They give reasons like "I may not necessarily want my database design to depend on a bunch of third parties (IATA, ISO), regardless of how stable their standards are. Or, I may not want to depend on a particular standard at all.":

I may not necessarily want my database design to depend on a bunch of third parties (IATA, ISO), regardless of how stable their standards are. Or, I may not want to depend on a particular standard at all.

enter image description here

Oddly enough those who disregard standards use standard USB ports, buy standard-sized DVDs and BluRays and drive cars with tires that conform to standards.

In the case of inexperienced programmers/database designers, it's because of not knowing. They tend to reinvent the wheel because they don't know a group of people spanning industries, already discussed the issue and came up with an standard approved by all who participated, often after very long discussions, revisions, etc. Recently a co-worker of mine showed incredulity when I told him there was an ISO standard regarding whether a given week is considered the last week of a year or the first one of the next year (ISO 8601). He didn't believe a standard existed regarding something so specific. I told him that the correctness of many applications depended on that standard.

In the case of experienced programmers/database designers, it's disregard caused by "knowing better", not-invented-here syndrome, and/or grandiosity. They don't trust ISO or any other standard bodies because they consider the ISO code is "not stable enough", meaning it will change someday. So they create their own, invented-here or auto incremented codes/identifiers hindering interoperability, which they also disregard. See this similar question, albeight database-design inclined. They give reasons like "I may not necessarily want my database design to depend on a bunch of third parties (IATA, ISO), regardless of how stable their standards are. Or, I may not want to depend on a particular standard at all."

enter image description here

Oddly enough those who disregard standards use standard USB ports, buy standard-sized DVDs and BluRays and drive cars with tires that conform to standards.

In the case of inexperienced programmers/database designers, it's because of not knowing. They tend to reinvent the wheel because they don't know a group of people spanning industries, already discussed the issue and came up with an standard approved by all who participated, often after very long discussions, revisions, etc. Recently a co-worker of mine showed incredulity when I told him there was an ISO standard regarding whether a given week is considered the last week of a year or the first one of the next year (ISO 8601). He didn't believe a standard existed regarding something so specific. I told him that the correctness of many applications depended on that standard.

In the case of experienced programmers/database designers, it's disregard caused by "knowing better", not-invented-here syndrome, and/or grandiosity. They don't trust ISO or any other standard bodies because they consider the ISO code is "not stable enough", meaning it will change someday. So they create their own, invented-here or auto incremented codes/identifiers hindering interoperability, which they also disregard. See this similar question, albeight database-design inclined. They give reasons like:

I may not necessarily want my database design to depend on a bunch of third parties (IATA, ISO), regardless of how stable their standards are. Or, I may not want to depend on a particular standard at all.

enter image description here

Oddly enough those who disregard standards use standard USB ports, buy standard-sized DVDs and BluRays and drive cars with tires that conform to standards.

3 added 240 characters in body
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In the case of inexperienced programmers/database designers, it's because of not knowing. They tend to reinvent the wheel because they don't know a group of people spanning industries, already discussed the issue and came up with an standard approved by all who participated, often after very long discussions, revisions, etc. Recently a co-worker of mine showed incredulity when I told him there was an ISO standard regarding whether a given week is considered the last week of a year or the first one of the next year (ISO 8601). He didn't believe a standard existed regarding something so specific. I told him that the correctness of many applications depended on that standard.

In the case of experienced programmers/database designers, it's disregard caused by "knowing better", not-invented-here syndrome, and/or grandiosity. They don't trust ISO or any other standard bodies because they consider the ISO code is "not stable enough", meaning it will change someday. So they create their own, invented-here or auto incremented codes/identifiers hindering interoperability, which they also disregard. See this similar question, albeight database-design inclined. They give reasons like "I may not necessarily want my database design to depend on a bunch of third parties (IATA, ISO), regardless of how stable their standards are. Or, I may not want to depend on a particular standard at all."

enter image description here

Oddly enough those who disregard standards use standard USB ports, buy standard-sized DVDs and BluRays and drive cars with tires that conform to standards.

In the case of inexperienced programmers/database designers, it's because of not knowing. They tend to reinvent the wheel because they don't know a group of people spanning industries, already discussed the issue and came up with an standard approved by all who participated, often after very long discussions, revisions, etc. Recently a co-worker of mine showed incredulity when I told him there was an ISO standard regarding whether a given week is considered the last week of a year or the first one of the next year (ISO 8601). He didn't believe a standard existed regarding something so specific. I told him that the correctness of many applications depended on that standard.

In the case of experienced programmers/database designers, it's disregard caused by "knowing better", not-invented-here syndrome, and/or grandiosity. They don't trust ISO or any other standard bodies because they consider the ISO code is "not stable enough", meaning it will change someday. So they create their own, invented-here or auto incremented codes/identifiers hindering interoperability, which they also disregard. See this similar question, albeight database-design inclined. They give reasons like "I may not necessarily want my database design to depend on a bunch of third parties (IATA, ISO), regardless of how stable their standards are. Or, I may not want to depend on a particular standard at all."

In the case of inexperienced programmers/database designers, it's because of not knowing. They tend to reinvent the wheel because they don't know a group of people spanning industries, already discussed the issue and came up with an standard approved by all who participated, often after very long discussions, revisions, etc. Recently a co-worker of mine showed incredulity when I told him there was an ISO standard regarding whether a given week is considered the last week of a year or the first one of the next year (ISO 8601). He didn't believe a standard existed regarding something so specific. I told him that the correctness of many applications depended on that standard.

In the case of experienced programmers/database designers, it's disregard caused by "knowing better", not-invented-here syndrome, and/or grandiosity. They don't trust ISO or any other standard bodies because they consider the ISO code is "not stable enough", meaning it will change someday. So they create their own, invented-here or auto incremented codes/identifiers hindering interoperability, which they also disregard. See this similar question, albeight database-design inclined. They give reasons like "I may not necessarily want my database design to depend on a bunch of third parties (IATA, ISO), regardless of how stable their standards are. Or, I may not want to depend on a particular standard at all."

enter image description here

Oddly enough those who disregard standards use standard USB ports, buy standard-sized DVDs and BluRays and drive cars with tires that conform to standards.

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