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The main thing to figure out is how old is the project and is it replacing / converting another project or truly a new project not attempted before.
I would try and find this out by talking to the people currently on the project. Use some discretion of course, just ask them about what they actually do and draw your own conclusions.

You may also find the following viewpoints worth mulling over:

  • generally 80% of programming is maintenance and bug fixes.
  • consider legacy code to include... the code you currently have in production
  • legacy code is also the code that... pays the bills. and maybe your salary.
  • as soon as a new project actually goes live, maintenance and bug fixes are required.
  • new projects often have more bugs than anticipated so the switch to bug fixing is often quick.

The main thing to figure out is how old is the project and is it replacing / converting another project or truly a new project not attempted before.
I would try and find this out by talking to the people currently on the project. Use some discretion of course, just ask them about what they actually do and draw your own conclusions.

You may also find the following viewpoints worth mulling over:

  • generally 80% of programming is maintenance and bug fixes.
  • consider legacy code to include... the code you currently have in production
  • legacy code is also the code that... pays the bills. and maybe your salary.
  • as soon as a new project actually goes live, maintenance and bug fixes are required.

The main thing to figure out is how old is the project and is it replacing / converting another project or truly a new project not attempted before.
I would try and find this out by talking to the people currently on the project. Use some discretion of course, just ask them about what they actually do and draw your own conclusions.

You may also find the following viewpoints worth mulling over:

  • generally 80% of programming is maintenance and bug fixes.
  • consider legacy code to include... the code you currently have in production
  • legacy code is also the code that... pays the bills. and maybe your salary.
  • as soon as a new project actually goes live, maintenance and bug fixes are required.
  • new projects often have more bugs than anticipated so the switch to bug fixing is often quick.
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source | link

The main thing to figure out is how old is the project and is it replacing / converting another project or truly a new project not attempted before.
I would try and find this out by talking to the people currently on the project. Use some discretion of course, just ask them about what they actually do and draw your own conclusions.

You may also find the following viewpoints worth mulling over:

  • generally 80% of programming is maintenance and bug fixes.
  • consider legacy code to include... the code you currently have in production
  • legacy code is also the code that... pays the bills. and maybe your salary.
  • as soon as a new project actually goes live, maintenance and bug fixes are required.