5 deleted 19 characters in body
source | link

Technology has advanced very much and now we have all the things Robert Harvey enumerates in his answer, but:

  • The problem seems to be changing requirements. The client knows that there will not be waste of materials when changing the requirements of a software project, so they do. That kind of requirement changes almost never happen once a physical-world project like a building, is half done.

  • Another important aspect is that programming continues to be highly handiwork. Rarely if ever, RAD-generated code goes into production without being modified by hand first.

  • Code continues to be highly complex, and that complexity doesn't seem to decrease with new technologies.

  • The rate of deadlines not met or budgets exceeded continues to be greater that those in other disciplines, and often times technical debt is incurred in order to meet them, generating hidden costs.

  • Something that have, without a doubt, happened is that compartmentalization has ocurred. The sheer ammount of technologies one has to know is so that programmers have had to specialized a small number of technologies in order to become really good at them, requiring different kinds of experts to complete a large project.

  • One thing that talks about software complexity is that whereas there are literally hundreds of car makers in the world, the list of companies capable of creating and maintaning an operating system, (desktop, mobile, embedded or otherwise), can be counted with the fingers of your hands.

  • All the above has created a situation in which there are not enough people studying to be programmers, so that governments have created campaigns in order to motivate more students into taking that career path.

  • One taste of the maturity of the software industry is that software licenses continue to state "<companyX> makes no representations about the suitability of this software for any particular purpose. It is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty." Imagine a hardware maker stating that they don't express their product to beis not suitable for any particular purpose. That's the state of the art right now.

Technology has advanced very much and now we have all the things Robert Harvey enumerates in his answer, but:

  • The problem seems to be changing requirements. The client knows that there will not be waste of materials when changing the requirements of a software project, so they do. That kind of requirement changes almost never happen once a physical-world project like a building, is half done.

  • Another important aspect is that programming continues to be highly handiwork. Rarely if ever, RAD-generated code goes into production without being modified by hand first.

  • Code continues to be highly complex, and that complexity doesn't seem to decrease with new technologies.

  • The rate of deadlines not met or budgets exceeded continues to be greater that those in other disciplines, and often times technical debt is incurred in order to meet them, generating hidden costs.

  • Something that have, without a doubt, happened is that compartmentalization has ocurred. The sheer ammount of technologies one has to know is so that programmers have had to specialized a small number of technologies in order to become really good at them, requiring different kinds of experts to complete a large project.

  • One thing that talks about software complexity is that whereas there are literally hundreds of car makers in the world, the list of companies capable of creating and maintaning an operating system, (desktop, mobile, embedded or otherwise), can be counted with the fingers of your hands.

  • All the above has created a situation in which there are not enough people studying to be programmers, so that governments have created campaigns in order to motivate more students into taking that career path.

  • One taste of the maturity of the software industry is that software licenses continue to state "<companyX> makes no representations about the suitability of this software for any particular purpose. It is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty." Imagine a hardware maker stating that they don't express their product to be suitable for any particular purpose. That's the state of the art right now.

Technology has advanced very much and now we have all the things Robert Harvey enumerates in his answer, but:

  • The problem seems to be changing requirements. The client knows that there will not be waste of materials when changing the requirements of a software project, so they do. That kind of requirement changes almost never happen once a physical-world project like a building, is half done.

  • Another important aspect is that programming continues to be highly handiwork. Rarely if ever, RAD-generated code goes into production without being modified by hand first.

  • Code continues to be highly complex, and that complexity doesn't seem to decrease with new technologies.

  • The rate of deadlines not met or budgets exceeded continues to be greater that those in other disciplines, and often times technical debt is incurred in order to meet them, generating hidden costs.

  • Something that have, without a doubt, happened is that compartmentalization has ocurred. The sheer ammount of technologies one has to know is so that programmers have had to specialized a small number of technologies in order to become really good at them, requiring different kinds of experts to complete a large project.

  • One thing that talks about software complexity is that whereas there are literally hundreds of car makers in the world, the list of companies capable of creating and maintaning an operating system, (desktop, mobile, embedded or otherwise), can be counted with the fingers of your hands.

  • All the above has created a situation in which there are not enough people studying to be programmers, so that governments have created campaigns in order to motivate more students into taking that career path.

  • One taste of the maturity of the software industry is that software licenses continue to state "<companyX> makes no representations about the suitability of this software for any particular purpose. It is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty." Imagine a hardware maker stating that their product is not suitable for any particular purpose. That's the state of the art right now.

4 corrected spelling
source | link

Technology has advanced very much and now we have all the things Robert Harvey enumerates in his answer, but:

  • The problem seems to be changing requirements. The client knows that there will not be waste of materials when changing the requirements of a software project, so they do. That kind of requirement changes almost never happen once a physical-world project like a building, is half done.

  • Another important aspect is that programming continues to be highly handiwork. Rarely if ever, RAD-generated code goes into production without being modified by hand first.

  • Code continues to be highly complex, and that complexity doesn't seem to decrease with new technologies.

  • The rate of deadlines not met or budgets exceeded continues to be greater that those in other disciplines, and often times technical debt is incurred in order to meet them, generating hidden costs.

  • Something that have, without a doubt, happened is that compartmentalization has ocurred. The sheer ammount of technologies one has to know is so that programmers have had to specialized a small number of technologies in order to become really good at them, requiring different kinds of experts to complete a large project.

  • One thing that talks about software complexity is that whereas there are literally hundreds of car makers in the world, the list of companies capable of creating and maintaning an operating system, (desktop, mobile, embedded or otherwise), can be counted with the fingers of your hands.

  • All the above has created a situation in which there are not enough people studingstudying to be programmers, so that governments have created campaigns in order to motivate more students into taking that career path.

  • One taste of the maturity of the software induestryindustry is that software licenceslicenses continue to state "<companyX> makes no representations about the suitability of this software for any particular purpose. It is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty." Imagine a hardware maker stating that they don't express their product to be suitable for any particular purpose. That's the state of the art right now.

Technology has advanced very much and now we have all the things Robert Harvey enumerates in his answer, but:

  • The problem seems to be changing requirements. The client knows that there will not be waste of materials when changing the requirements of a software project, so they do. That kind of requirement changes almost never happen once a physical-world project like a building, is half done.

  • Another important aspect is that programming continues to be highly handiwork. Rarely if ever, RAD-generated code goes into production without being modified by hand first.

  • Code continues to be highly complex, and that complexity doesn't seem to decrease with new technologies.

  • The rate of deadlines not met or budgets exceeded continues to be greater that those in other disciplines, and often times technical debt is incurred in order to meet them, generating hidden costs.

  • Something that have, without a doubt, happened is that compartmentalization has ocurred. The sheer ammount of technologies one has to know is so that programmers have had to specialized a small number of technologies in order to become really good at them, requiring different kinds of experts to complete a large project.

  • One thing that talks about software complexity is that whereas there are literally hundreds of car makers in the world, the list of companies capable of creating and maintaning an operating system, (desktop, mobile, embedded or otherwise), can be counted with the fingers of your hands.

  • All the above has created a situation in which there are not enough people studing to be programmers, so that governments have created campaigns in order to motivate more students into taking that career path.

  • One taste of the maturity of the software induestry is that software licences continue to state "<companyX> makes no representations about the suitability of this software for any particular purpose. It is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty." Imagine a hardware maker stating that they don't express their product to be suitable for any particular purpose. That's the state of the art right now.

Technology has advanced very much and now we have all the things Robert Harvey enumerates in his answer, but:

  • The problem seems to be changing requirements. The client knows that there will not be waste of materials when changing the requirements of a software project, so they do. That kind of requirement changes almost never happen once a physical-world project like a building, is half done.

  • Another important aspect is that programming continues to be highly handiwork. Rarely if ever, RAD-generated code goes into production without being modified by hand first.

  • Code continues to be highly complex, and that complexity doesn't seem to decrease with new technologies.

  • The rate of deadlines not met or budgets exceeded continues to be greater that those in other disciplines, and often times technical debt is incurred in order to meet them, generating hidden costs.

  • Something that have, without a doubt, happened is that compartmentalization has ocurred. The sheer ammount of technologies one has to know is so that programmers have had to specialized a small number of technologies in order to become really good at them, requiring different kinds of experts to complete a large project.

  • One thing that talks about software complexity is that whereas there are literally hundreds of car makers in the world, the list of companies capable of creating and maintaning an operating system, (desktop, mobile, embedded or otherwise), can be counted with the fingers of your hands.

  • All the above has created a situation in which there are not enough people studying to be programmers, so that governments have created campaigns in order to motivate more students into taking that career path.

  • One taste of the maturity of the software industry is that software licenses continue to state "<companyX> makes no representations about the suitability of this software for any particular purpose. It is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty." Imagine a hardware maker stating that they don't express their product to be suitable for any particular purpose. That's the state of the art right now.

3 edited body
source | link

Technology has advanced very much and now we have all the things Robert Harvey enumerates in his answer, but:

  • The problem seems to be changing requirements. The client knows that there will not be waste of materials when changing the requirements of a software project, so they do. That kind of requirement changes almost never happen once a physical-world project like a building, is half done.

  • Another important aspect is that programming continues to be highly handiwork. Rarely if ever, RAD-generated code goes into production without being modified by hand first.

  • Code continues to be highly complex, and that complexity doesn't seem to decrease with new technologies.

  • The rate of deadlines not met or budgets exceeded continues to be greater that those in other disciplines, and often times technical debt is incurred in order to meet them, generating hidden costs.

  • Something that have, without a doubt, happened is that compartmentalization has ocurred. The sheer ammount of technologies one has to know is so that programmers have had to specialized a small number of technologies in order to become really good at them, requiring different kinds of experts to complete a large project.

  • One thing that talks about software complexity is that whereas there are literally hundreds of car makers in the world, the list of companies capable of creating and maintaning an operating system, (desktop, mobile, embedded or otherwise), can be counted with the fingers of your hands.

  • All the above has created a situation in which there are not enough people studing to be programmers, so that governments have created campaigns in order to motivate more students into taking that career path.

  • One taste of the maturity of the software induestry is that software licences continue to state "<companyX> makes no representations about the suitability of this software for any particular purpose. It is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty." ImagingImagine a hardware maker stating that they don't express their product to be suitable for any particular purpose. That's the state of the art right now.

Technology has advanced very much and now we have all the things Robert Harvey enumerates in his answer, but:

  • The problem seems to be changing requirements. The client knows that there will not be waste of materials when changing the requirements of a software project, so they do. That kind of requirement changes almost never happen once a physical-world project like a building, is half done.

  • Another important aspect is that programming continues to be highly handiwork. Rarely if ever, RAD-generated code goes into production without being modified by hand first.

  • Code continues to be highly complex, and that complexity doesn't seem to decrease with new technologies.

  • The rate of deadlines not met or budgets exceeded continues to be greater that those in other disciplines, and often times technical debt is incurred in order to meet them, generating hidden costs.

  • Something that have, without a doubt, happened is that compartmentalization has ocurred. The sheer ammount of technologies one has to know is so that programmers have had to specialized a small number of technologies in order to become really good at them, requiring different kinds of experts to complete a large project.

  • One thing that talks about software complexity is that whereas there are literally hundreds of car makers in the world, the list of companies capable of creating and maintaning an operating system, (desktop, mobile, embedded or otherwise), can be counted with the fingers of your hands.

  • All the above has created a situation in which there are not enough people studing to be programmers, so that governments have created campaigns in order to motivate more students into taking that career path.

  • One taste of the maturity of the software induestry is that software licences continue to state "<companyX> makes no representations about the suitability of this software for any particular purpose. It is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty." Imaging a hardware maker stating that they don't express their product to be suitable for any particular purpose. That's the state of the art right now.

Technology has advanced very much and now we have all the things Robert Harvey enumerates in his answer, but:

  • The problem seems to be changing requirements. The client knows that there will not be waste of materials when changing the requirements of a software project, so they do. That kind of requirement changes almost never happen once a physical-world project like a building, is half done.

  • Another important aspect is that programming continues to be highly handiwork. Rarely if ever, RAD-generated code goes into production without being modified by hand first.

  • Code continues to be highly complex, and that complexity doesn't seem to decrease with new technologies.

  • The rate of deadlines not met or budgets exceeded continues to be greater that those in other disciplines, and often times technical debt is incurred in order to meet them, generating hidden costs.

  • Something that have, without a doubt, happened is that compartmentalization has ocurred. The sheer ammount of technologies one has to know is so that programmers have had to specialized a small number of technologies in order to become really good at them, requiring different kinds of experts to complete a large project.

  • One thing that talks about software complexity is that whereas there are literally hundreds of car makers in the world, the list of companies capable of creating and maintaning an operating system, (desktop, mobile, embedded or otherwise), can be counted with the fingers of your hands.

  • All the above has created a situation in which there are not enough people studing to be programmers, so that governments have created campaigns in order to motivate more students into taking that career path.

  • One taste of the maturity of the software induestry is that software licences continue to state "<companyX> makes no representations about the suitability of this software for any particular purpose. It is provided "as is" without express or implied warranty." Imagine a hardware maker stating that they don't express their product to be suitable for any particular purpose. That's the state of the art right now.

2 added 431 characters in body
source | link
1
source | link