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Yes, if you link your code with the Rcpp library and distribute the derivative work, your package will almost certainly be subject to the GPL. The answers to this related questionthis related question apply to your situation.

Sometimes, the author of a work will offer a choice between commercial and open-source licenses (with a fee often required for the commercial option), but it doesn't appear that this is the case with Rcpp.

Yes, if you link your code with the Rcpp library and distribute the derivative work, your package will almost certainly be subject to the GPL. The answers to this related question apply to your situation.

Sometimes, the author of a work will offer a choice between commercial and open-source licenses (with a fee often required for the commercial option), but it doesn't appear that this is the case with Rcpp.

Yes, if you link your code with the Rcpp library and distribute the derivative work, your package will almost certainly be subject to the GPL. The answers to this related question apply to your situation.

Sometimes, the author of a work will offer a choice between commercial and open-source licenses (with a fee often required for the commercial option), but it doesn't appear that this is the case with Rcpp.

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source | link

Yes, if you link your code with the Rcpp library and distribute the derivative work, your package will almost certainly be subject to the GPL. The answers to this related question apply to your situation.

Sometimes, the author of a work will offer a choice between commercial and open-source licenses (with a fee often required for the commercial option), but it doesn't appear that this is the case with Rcpp.