Question Protected by gnat
    Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackProgrammer/status/519292051062390784
4 added 2 characters in body
source | link

During a code review today, a colleague of mine said something interesting:

prototype is only useful when you need inheritance - and when's inheritance ever a good ideawhen's inheritance ever a good idea?

I thought about this and I realised that I usually use inheritance to get around code that was badly designed in the first place. Modern OO style prefers composition over inheritance, but I don't know of any languages which have taken this to heart and actually enforce it.

Are there any general-purpose programming languages with classes, objects, methods, interfaces, and so on, which disallow class-based inheritance? (If such an idea doesn't make sense, why not?)

During a code review today, a colleague of mine said something interesting:

prototype is only useful when you need inheritance - and when's inheritance ever a good idea?

I thought about this and I realised that I usually use inheritance to get around code that was badly designed in the first place. Modern OO style prefers composition over inheritance, but I don't know of any languages which have taken this to heart and actually enforce it.

Are there any general-purpose programming languages with classes, objects, methods, interfaces, and so on, which disallow class-based inheritance? (If such an idea doesn't make sense, why not?)

During a code review today, a colleague of mine said something interesting:

prototype is only useful when you need inheritance - and when's inheritance ever a good idea?

I thought about this and I realised that I usually use inheritance to get around code that was badly designed in the first place. Modern OO style prefers composition over inheritance, but I don't know of any languages which have taken this to heart and actually enforce it.

Are there any general-purpose programming languages with classes, objects, methods, interfaces, and so on, which disallow class-based inheritance? (If such an idea doesn't make sense, why not?)

3 deleted 17 characters in body
source | link

During a code review today, a colleague of mine said something interesting about Javascript:

prototype is only useful when you need inheritance - and when's inheritance ever a good idea?

I thought about this and I realised that I usually use inheritance to get around code that was badly designed in the first place. Modern OO style prefers composition over inheritance, but I don't know of any languages which have taken this to heart and actually enforce it.

Are there any general-purpose programming languages with classes, objects, methods, interfaces, and so on, which disallow class-based inheritance? (If such an idea doesn't make sense, why not?)

During a code review today, a colleague of mine said something interesting about Javascript:

prototype is only useful when you need inheritance - and when's inheritance ever a good idea?

I thought about this and I realised that I usually use inheritance to get around code that was badly designed in the first place. Modern OO style prefers composition over inheritance, but I don't know of any languages which have taken this to heart and actually enforce it.

Are there any general-purpose programming languages with classes, objects, methods, interfaces, and so on, which disallow class-based inheritance? (If such an idea doesn't make sense, why not?)

During a code review today, a colleague of mine said something interesting:

prototype is only useful when you need inheritance - and when's inheritance ever a good idea?

I thought about this and I realised that I usually use inheritance to get around code that was badly designed in the first place. Modern OO style prefers composition over inheritance, but I don't know of any languages which have taken this to heart and actually enforce it.

Are there any general-purpose programming languages with classes, objects, methods, interfaces, and so on, which disallow class-based inheritance? (If such an idea doesn't make sense, why not?)

2 added 23 characters in body
source | link

During a code review today, a colleague of mine said something interesting about Javascript:

prototype is only useful when you need inheritance - and when's inheritance ever a good idea?

I thought about this and I realised that I usually use inheritance to get around code that was badly designed in the first place. Modern OO style prefers composition over inheritance, but I don't know of any languages which actually enforcehave taken this styleto heart and actually enforce it.

Are there any general-purpose programming languages with classes, objects, methods, interfaces, and so on, which disallow class-based inheritance? (If such an idea doesn't make sense, why not?)

During a code review today, a colleague of mine said something interesting about Javascript:

prototype is only useful when you need inheritance - and when's inheritance ever a good idea?

I thought about this and I realised that I usually use inheritance to get around code that was badly designed in the first place. Modern OO style prefers composition over inheritance, but I don't know of any languages which actually enforce this style.

Are there any general-purpose programming languages with classes, objects, methods, interfaces, and so on, which disallow class-based inheritance? (If such an idea doesn't make sense, why not?)

During a code review today, a colleague of mine said something interesting about Javascript:

prototype is only useful when you need inheritance - and when's inheritance ever a good idea?

I thought about this and I realised that I usually use inheritance to get around code that was badly designed in the first place. Modern OO style prefers composition over inheritance, but I don't know of any languages which have taken this to heart and actually enforce it.

Are there any general-purpose programming languages with classes, objects, methods, interfaces, and so on, which disallow class-based inheritance? (If such an idea doesn't make sense, why not?)

1
source | link