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Conventional parsers consume their entire input and produce a single parse tree. I'm looking for one that consumes a continuous stream and produces a parse forest [edit: see discussion in comments regarding why this use of that term may be unconventional]. My gut says that I can't be the first person to need (or think I need) such a parser, but I've searched off and on for months to no avail.

I recognize that I may be ensnared by the XY problem. My ultimate purpose is to parse a stream of text, ignoring most of it, and produce a stream of parse trees from the sections that are recognized.

So my question is conditional: if a class of parsers with these characteristics exists, what is it called? And if not, why not? What is the alternative? Perhaps I'm missing some way I can make conventional parsers do what I want.

Conventional parsers consume their entire input and produce a single parse tree. I'm looking for one that consumes a continuous stream and produces a parse forest. My gut says that I can't be the first person to need (or think I need) such a parser, but I've searched off and on for months to no avail.

I recognize that I may be ensnared by the XY problem. My ultimate purpose is to parse a stream of text, ignoring most of it, and produce a stream of parse trees from the sections that are recognized.

So my question is conditional: if a class of parsers with these characteristics exists, what is it called? And if not, why not? What is the alternative? Perhaps I'm missing some way I can make conventional parsers do what I want.

Conventional parsers consume their entire input and produce a single parse tree. I'm looking for one that consumes a continuous stream and produces a parse forest [edit: see discussion in comments regarding why this use of that term may be unconventional]. My gut says that I can't be the first person to need (or think I need) such a parser, but I've searched off and on for months to no avail.

I recognize that I may be ensnared by the XY problem. My ultimate purpose is to parse a stream of text, ignoring most of it, and produce a stream of parse trees from the sections that are recognized.

So my question is conditional: if a class of parsers with these characteristics exists, what is it called? And if not, why not? What is the alternative? Perhaps I'm missing some way I can make conventional parsers do what I want.

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Name for this type of parser, OR why it doesn't exist

Conventional parsers consume their entire input and produce a single parse tree. I'm looking for one that consumes a continuous stream and produces a parse forest. My gut says that I can't be the first person to need (or think I need) such a parser, but I've searched off and on for months to no avail.

I recognize that I may be ensnared by the XY problem. My ultimate purpose is to parse a stream of text, ignoring most of it, and produce a stream of parse trees from the sections that are recognized.

So my question is conditional: if a class of parsers with these characteristics exists, what is it called? And if not, why not? What is the alternative? Perhaps I'm missing some way I can make conventional parsers do what I want.