2 added 2 characters in body
source | link

In General Terms

Profound knowledge of any programming language is likely to help you with picking up other languages quicker. That is so partially because programming is a way of thinking more than it is learning syntax. Most programming practices would be true of most other programming languages. That is why people say that you always learn the second programming language quicker than the first.

In Specific Terms

C++ is a language which allows for a much greater freedom'control' than other languages. This can be both good and bad. For example a real gun is better than a air gun when you go in the forest (because you can actually shoot something down with it), but it is also more dangerous for you and those around you. C++ has concepts such as memory management, which you don't need to worry about in most other languages. Having a firm grasp of these concepts however is far from pointless even when working with auto memory management languages. You can also perform bitwise operations and go much lower down to the 'metal' with a language like C++. Even a basic understanding in those areas can help you a lot as a programmer in any language.

Personal Opinion

I personally learned Java first for nearly 3 years before learning C++, and I should say that I sort of regret it (uni course...). This made learning C++ (i'm still learning - far from 'profound' knowledge :D) not as straightforward as i'd like it. If I had done it the other way around I would say that it would have been much easier for me. Especially when you know WHY something is done in a specific way, and not just rest assured on the auto-magicness of the language. If I am allowed to give an opinion I would suggest: C (for basic and universal programming paradigms) -> C++ (for basic understanding of OOP along with memory management) -> Then you can go into any 'real' OOP language with a good foundation or you can continue with more advanced topics in C++, all depending on what you're planning on doing.

In General Terms

Profound knowledge of any programming language is likely to help you with picking up other languages quicker. That is so partially because programming is a way of thinking more than it is learning syntax. Most programming practices would be true of most other programming languages. That is why people say that you always learn the second programming language quicker than the first.

In Specific Terms

C++ is a language which allows for a much greater freedom than other languages. This can be both good and bad. For example a real gun is better than a air gun when you go in the forest (because you can actually shoot something down with it), but it is also more dangerous for you and those around you. C++ has concepts such as memory management, which you don't need to worry about in most other languages. Having a firm grasp of these concepts however is far from pointless even when working with auto memory management languages. You can also perform bitwise operations and go much lower down to the 'metal' with a language like C++. Even a basic understanding in those areas can help you a lot as a programmer in any language.

Personal Opinion

I personally learned Java first for nearly 3 years before learning C++, and I should say that I sort of regret it (uni course...). This made learning C++ (i'm still learning - far from 'profound' knowledge :D) not as straightforward as i'd like it. If I had done it the other way around I would say that it would have been much easier for me. Especially when you know WHY something is done in a specific way, and not just rest assured on the auto-magicness of the language. If I am allowed to give an opinion I would suggest: C (for basic and universal programming paradigms) -> C++ (for basic understanding of OOP along with memory management) -> Then you can go into any 'real' OOP language with a good foundation or you can continue with more advanced topics in C++, all depending on what you're planning on doing.

In General Terms

Profound knowledge of any programming language is likely to help you with picking up other languages quicker. That is so partially because programming is a way of thinking more than it is learning syntax. Most programming practices would be true of most other programming languages. That is why people say that you always learn the second programming language quicker than the first.

In Specific Terms

C++ is a language which allows for a much greater 'control' than other languages. This can be both good and bad. For example a real gun is better than a air gun when you go in the forest (because you can actually shoot something down with it), but it is also more dangerous for you and those around you. C++ has concepts such as memory management, which you don't need to worry about in most other languages. Having a firm grasp of these concepts however is far from pointless even when working with auto memory management languages. You can also perform bitwise operations and go much lower down to the 'metal' with a language like C++. Even a basic understanding in those areas can help you a lot as a programmer in any language.

Personal Opinion

I personally learned Java first for nearly 3 years before learning C++, and I should say that I sort of regret it (uni course...). This made learning C++ (i'm still learning - far from 'profound' knowledge :D) not as straightforward as i'd like it. If I had done it the other way around I would say that it would have been much easier for me. Especially when you know WHY something is done in a specific way, and not just rest assured on the auto-magicness of the language. If I am allowed to give an opinion I would suggest: C (for basic and universal programming paradigms) -> C++ (for basic understanding of OOP along with memory management) -> Then you can go into any 'real' OOP language with a good foundation or you can continue with more advanced topics in C++, all depending on what you're planning on doing.

1
source | link

In General Terms

Profound knowledge of any programming language is likely to help you with picking up other languages quicker. That is so partially because programming is a way of thinking more than it is learning syntax. Most programming practices would be true of most other programming languages. That is why people say that you always learn the second programming language quicker than the first.

In Specific Terms

C++ is a language which allows for a much greater freedom than other languages. This can be both good and bad. For example a real gun is better than a air gun when you go in the forest (because you can actually shoot something down with it), but it is also more dangerous for you and those around you. C++ has concepts such as memory management, which you don't need to worry about in most other languages. Having a firm grasp of these concepts however is far from pointless even when working with auto memory management languages. You can also perform bitwise operations and go much lower down to the 'metal' with a language like C++. Even a basic understanding in those areas can help you a lot as a programmer in any language.

Personal Opinion

I personally learned Java first for nearly 3 years before learning C++, and I should say that I sort of regret it (uni course...). This made learning C++ (i'm still learning - far from 'profound' knowledge :D) not as straightforward as i'd like it. If I had done it the other way around I would say that it would have been much easier for me. Especially when you know WHY something is done in a specific way, and not just rest assured on the auto-magicness of the language. If I am allowed to give an opinion I would suggest: C (for basic and universal programming paradigms) -> C++ (for basic understanding of OOP along with memory management) -> Then you can go into any 'real' OOP language with a good foundation or you can continue with more advanced topics in C++, all depending on what you're planning on doing.