6 replaced http://programmers.stackexchange.com/ with https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/
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I'm a relatively new developer, fresh from college. While in college and during subsequent job-seeking, I realized that there were a lot of "modern" software development methodologies that my education was lacking: unit testing, logging, database normalization, agile development (vs. generic agile concepts), coding style guides, refactoring, code reviews, no standardized documentation methods (or even requirements), etc.

Overall, I didn't see this is a problem. I expected my first job to embrace all of these ideas and to teach them to me on the job. Then I got my first job (full stack web development) at a big corporation and I realized that we do none of these things. In fact I, the least experienced on the team, am the one who is spearheading attempts to bring my team up to speed with "modern" programming techniques - as I worry that not doing so is professional suicide down the road.

First I began with logging software (log4J), but then I quickly moved on to writing my own styleguide, then abandoning it for the Google styleguide - and then I realized that our Java web development used hand-written front controllers, so I pushed for our adoption of Spring - but then I realized we had no unit tests, either, but I was already learning Spring... and as you can see, it becomes overwhelming all too quickly, especially when paired with normal development work. Furthermore, it is difficult for me to become "expert" enough in these methodologies to teach anyone else in them without devoting too much time to a single one of them, let alone them all.

Of all these techniques, which I see as "expected" in today's software development world, how do I integrate them into a team as a new player without overwhelming both myself and the team?

How can I influence my team to become more agile?How can I influence my team to become more agile? is related, but I'm not an Agile developer like the asker here, and I'm looking at a much broader set of methodologies than Agile.

I'm a relatively new developer, fresh from college. While in college and during subsequent job-seeking, I realized that there were a lot of "modern" software development methodologies that my education was lacking: unit testing, logging, database normalization, agile development (vs. generic agile concepts), coding style guides, refactoring, code reviews, no standardized documentation methods (or even requirements), etc.

Overall, I didn't see this is a problem. I expected my first job to embrace all of these ideas and to teach them to me on the job. Then I got my first job (full stack web development) at a big corporation and I realized that we do none of these things. In fact I, the least experienced on the team, am the one who is spearheading attempts to bring my team up to speed with "modern" programming techniques - as I worry that not doing so is professional suicide down the road.

First I began with logging software (log4J), but then I quickly moved on to writing my own styleguide, then abandoning it for the Google styleguide - and then I realized that our Java web development used hand-written front controllers, so I pushed for our adoption of Spring - but then I realized we had no unit tests, either, but I was already learning Spring... and as you can see, it becomes overwhelming all too quickly, especially when paired with normal development work. Furthermore, it is difficult for me to become "expert" enough in these methodologies to teach anyone else in them without devoting too much time to a single one of them, let alone them all.

Of all these techniques, which I see as "expected" in today's software development world, how do I integrate them into a team as a new player without overwhelming both myself and the team?

How can I influence my team to become more agile? is related, but I'm not an Agile developer like the asker here, and I'm looking at a much broader set of methodologies than Agile.

I'm a relatively new developer, fresh from college. While in college and during subsequent job-seeking, I realized that there were a lot of "modern" software development methodologies that my education was lacking: unit testing, logging, database normalization, agile development (vs. generic agile concepts), coding style guides, refactoring, code reviews, no standardized documentation methods (or even requirements), etc.

Overall, I didn't see this is a problem. I expected my first job to embrace all of these ideas and to teach them to me on the job. Then I got my first job (full stack web development) at a big corporation and I realized that we do none of these things. In fact I, the least experienced on the team, am the one who is spearheading attempts to bring my team up to speed with "modern" programming techniques - as I worry that not doing so is professional suicide down the road.

First I began with logging software (log4J), but then I quickly moved on to writing my own styleguide, then abandoning it for the Google styleguide - and then I realized that our Java web development used hand-written front controllers, so I pushed for our adoption of Spring - but then I realized we had no unit tests, either, but I was already learning Spring... and as you can see, it becomes overwhelming all too quickly, especially when paired with normal development work. Furthermore, it is difficult for me to become "expert" enough in these methodologies to teach anyone else in them without devoting too much time to a single one of them, let alone them all.

Of all these techniques, which I see as "expected" in today's software development world, how do I integrate them into a team as a new player without overwhelming both myself and the team?

How can I influence my team to become more agile? is related, but I'm not an Agile developer like the asker here, and I'm looking at a much broader set of methodologies than Agile.

5 removed irrelevant tag
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    Post Closed as "too broad" by GlenH7, durron597, Ampt, user40980, Robert Harvey
4 let's just show the question title so that people know what it's about and whether they've already seen it without having to visit or mouseover to read the link URL. (just pasting the question URL will magically produce the title for questions within the same stack site.)
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I'm a relatively new developer, fresh from college. While in college and during subsequent job-seeking, I realized that there were a lot of "modern" software development methodologies that my education was lacking: unit testing, logging, database normalization, agile development (vs. generic agile concepts), coding style guides, refactoring, code reviews, no standardized documentation methods (or even requirements), etc.

Overall, I didn't see this is a problem. I expected my first job to embrace all of these ideas and to teach them to me on the job. Then I got my first job (full stack web development) at a big corporation and I realized that we do none of these things. In fact I, the least experienced on the team, am the one who is spearheading attempts to bring my team up to speed with "modern" programming techniques - as I worry that not doing so is professional suicide down the road.

First I began with logging software (log4J), but then I quickly moved on to writing my own styleguide, then abandoning it for the Google styleguide - and then I realized that our Java web development used hand-written front controllers, so I pushed for our adoption of Spring - but then I realized we had no unit tests, either, but I was already learning Spring... and as you can see, it becomes overwhelming all too quickly, especially when paired with normal development work. Furthermore, it is difficult for me to become "expert" enough in these methodologies to teach anyone else in them without devoting too much time to a single one of them, let alone them all.

Of all these techniques, which I see as "expected" in today's software development world, how do I integrate them into a team as a new player without overwhelming both myself and the team?

Related
http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/102586/how-can-i-influence-my-team-to-become-more-agileHow can I influence my team to become more agile? is related, exceptbut I'm not an Agile developer like the asker here, and I'm looking at a much broader set of methodologies than Agile.

I'm a relatively new developer, fresh from college. While in college and during subsequent job-seeking, I realized that there were a lot of "modern" software development methodologies that my education was lacking: unit testing, logging, database normalization, agile development (vs. generic agile concepts), coding style guides, refactoring, code reviews, no standardized documentation methods (or even requirements), etc.

Overall, I didn't see this is a problem. I expected my first job to embrace all of these ideas and to teach them to me on the job. Then I got my first job (full stack web development) at a big corporation and I realized that we do none of these things. In fact I, the least experienced on the team, am the one who is spearheading attempts to bring my team up to speed with "modern" programming techniques - as I worry that not doing so is professional suicide down the road.

First I began with logging software (log4J), but then I quickly moved on to writing my own styleguide, then abandoning it for the Google styleguide - and then I realized that our Java web development used hand-written front controllers, so I pushed for our adoption of Spring - but then I realized we had no unit tests, either, but I was already learning Spring... and as you can see, it becomes overwhelming all too quickly, especially when paired with normal development work. Furthermore, it is difficult for me to become "expert" enough in these methodologies to teach anyone else in them without devoting too much time to a single one of them, let alone them all.

Of all these techniques, which I see as "expected" in today's software development world, how do I integrate them into a team as a new player without overwhelming both myself and the team?

Related
http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/102586/how-can-i-influence-my-team-to-become-more-agile, except I'm not an Agile developer like the asker here and I'm looking at a much broader set of methodologies than Agile.

I'm a relatively new developer, fresh from college. While in college and during subsequent job-seeking, I realized that there were a lot of "modern" software development methodologies that my education was lacking: unit testing, logging, database normalization, agile development (vs. generic agile concepts), coding style guides, refactoring, code reviews, no standardized documentation methods (or even requirements), etc.

Overall, I didn't see this is a problem. I expected my first job to embrace all of these ideas and to teach them to me on the job. Then I got my first job (full stack web development) at a big corporation and I realized that we do none of these things. In fact I, the least experienced on the team, am the one who is spearheading attempts to bring my team up to speed with "modern" programming techniques - as I worry that not doing so is professional suicide down the road.

First I began with logging software (log4J), but then I quickly moved on to writing my own styleguide, then abandoning it for the Google styleguide - and then I realized that our Java web development used hand-written front controllers, so I pushed for our adoption of Spring - but then I realized we had no unit tests, either, but I was already learning Spring... and as you can see, it becomes overwhelming all too quickly, especially when paired with normal development work. Furthermore, it is difficult for me to become "expert" enough in these methodologies to teach anyone else in them without devoting too much time to a single one of them, let alone them all.

Of all these techniques, which I see as "expected" in today's software development world, how do I integrate them into a team as a new player without overwhelming both myself and the team?

How can I influence my team to become more agile? is related, but I'm not an Agile developer like the asker here, and I'm looking at a much broader set of methodologies than Agile.

3 let's just show the question title so that people know what it's about and whether they've already seen it without having to visit or mouseover to read the link URL. (just pasting the question URL will magically produce the title for questions within the same stack site.)
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    Question Protected by gnat
    Post Reopened by Thomas Owens
    Post Closed as "primarily opinion-based" by Doc Brown, gnat, user22815, BЈовић, Thomas Owens
2 Further clarified why this is not a duplicate of the ID'd question.
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