2 corrected spelling; oops
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Since you are really only just starting out in your career, it may not be as hard as you think to get a job using the MS technology stack with very little experience. You just have to be willing to shoot for the junior jobs.

I've hired a lot of people, and I have different expectations of their experience based on the position I'm trying to fill. If I'm looking at a senior or architect level role, I'd expect to see a fair amount of experience. But not all of it has to be in the exact technology or skill set I'm looking for. If I want someone with C# experience but they have 5 of Java and 3 of C++, I know they aren't going to have much difficulty picking up a new language. By the way, as you get further into your career, you will quickly realize that learning a new language often isn't a big deal. Learning all the libraries and idioms of the language is what takes tometime.

When I'm looking at a junior position, I give a lot less weight to their experience. I really want to figure out of they have the capability to learn. Getting your CS (or whatever) degree is a good step in that direction, because it shows that you were able to learn something. If you have work experience in the CS field, great. Someone thought you were smart enough to hire. I'm going to throw some programming questions at you (maybe on paper, maybe on a whiteboard) and ask you to solve them in your favorite language. Yes, in the language of your choice. What I'm trying to see is if you can work your way through a problem, and I'll be able to follow enough your whatever language you pick to see whether you got the answer right or not.

Obviously if you know something about the technology the job will require, all the better. Spend your off hours boning up on the subjects so you will at least be able to recognize the important keywords they might throw at you.

To give you some more hope, I hired a guy who had some C experience but not a lot. It was for a junior C job. The guy was obviously smart, well spoken, and could reason through the problem. Unfortunately, he was still a bit weak on the C side. We said, "tell you what, work on your C, come back in a couple of weeks, and we'll try this again." He did, we asked him different questions (obviously), and he was definitely better. Not knock it out of the park better, but a definite improvement. We decided to hire him, and didn't regret it. He worked hard, and when he wasn't sure, he asked questions.

So the upshot of this long winded ramble is, if you want to change what you are working on, go for it. Especially this early in your career. Shoot for the jobs and see what happens. If you can, get some feedback on where you did well, and not so well. In the end, it will be worth it.

Since you are really only just starting out in your career, it may not be as hard as you think to get a job using the MS technology stack with very little experience. You just have to be willing to shoot for the junior jobs.

I've hired a lot of people, and I have different expectations of their experience based on the position I'm trying to fill. If I'm looking at a senior or architect level role, I'd expect to see a fair amount of experience. But not all of it has to be in the exact technology or skill set I'm looking for. If I want someone with C# experience but they have 5 of Java and 3 of C++, I know they aren't going to have much difficulty picking up a new language. By the way, as you get further into your career, you will quickly realize that learning a new language often isn't a big deal. Learning all the libraries and idioms of the language is what takes tome.

When I'm looking at a junior position, I give a lot less weight to their experience. I really want to figure out of they have the capability to learn. Getting your CS (or whatever) degree is a good step in that direction, because it shows that you were able to learn something. If you have work experience in the CS field, great. Someone thought you were smart enough to hire. I'm going to throw some programming questions at you (maybe on paper, maybe on a whiteboard) and ask you to solve them in your favorite language. Yes, in the language of your choice. What I'm trying to see is if you can work your way through a problem, and I'll be able to follow enough your whatever language you pick to see whether you got the answer right or not.

Obviously if you know something about the technology the job will require, all the better. Spend your off hours boning up on the subjects so you will at least be able to recognize the important keywords they might throw at you.

To give you some more hope, I hired a guy who had some C experience but not a lot. It was for a junior C job. The guy was obviously smart, well spoken, and could reason through the problem. Unfortunately, he was still a bit weak on the C side. We said, "tell you what, work on your C, come back in a couple of weeks, and we'll try this again." He did, we asked him different questions (obviously), and he was definitely better. Not knock it out of the park better, but a definite improvement. We decided to hire him, and didn't regret it. He worked hard, and when he wasn't sure, he asked questions.

So the upshot of this long winded ramble is, if you want to change what you are working on, go for it. Especially this early in your career. Shoot for the jobs and see what happens. If you can, get some feedback on where you did well, and not so well. In the end, it will be worth it.

Since you are really only just starting out in your career, it may not be as hard as you think to get a job using the MS technology stack with very little experience. You just have to be willing to shoot for the junior jobs.

I've hired a lot of people, and I have different expectations of their experience based on the position I'm trying to fill. If I'm looking at a senior or architect level role, I'd expect to see a fair amount of experience. But not all of it has to be in the exact technology or skill set I'm looking for. If I want someone with C# experience but they have 5 of Java and 3 of C++, I know they aren't going to have much difficulty picking up a new language. By the way, as you get further into your career, you will quickly realize that learning a new language often isn't a big deal. Learning all the libraries and idioms of the language is what takes time.

When I'm looking at a junior position, I give a lot less weight to their experience. I really want to figure out of they have the capability to learn. Getting your CS (or whatever) degree is a good step in that direction, because it shows that you were able to learn something. If you have work experience in the CS field, great. Someone thought you were smart enough to hire. I'm going to throw some programming questions at you (maybe on paper, maybe on a whiteboard) and ask you to solve them in your favorite language. Yes, in the language of your choice. What I'm trying to see is if you can work your way through a problem, and I'll be able to follow enough your whatever language you pick to see whether you got the answer right or not.

Obviously if you know something about the technology the job will require, all the better. Spend your off hours boning up on the subjects so you will at least be able to recognize the important keywords they might throw at you.

To give you some more hope, I hired a guy who had some C experience but not a lot. It was for a junior C job. The guy was obviously smart, well spoken, and could reason through the problem. Unfortunately, he was still a bit weak on the C side. We said, "tell you what, work on your C, come back in a couple of weeks, and we'll try this again." He did, we asked him different questions (obviously), and he was definitely better. Not knock it out of the park better, but a definite improvement. We decided to hire him, and didn't regret it. He worked hard, and when he wasn't sure, he asked questions.

So the upshot of this long winded ramble is, if you want to change what you are working on, go for it. Especially this early in your career. Shoot for the jobs and see what happens. If you can, get some feedback on where you did well, and not so well. In the end, it will be worth it.

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source | link

Since you are really only just starting out in your career, it may not be as hard as you think to get a job using the MS technology stack with very little experience. You just have to be willing to shoot for the junior jobs.

I've hired a lot of people, and I have different expectations of their experience based on the position I'm trying to fill. If I'm looking at a senior or architect level role, I'd expect to see a fair amount of experience. But not all of it has to be in the exact technology or skill set I'm looking for. If I want someone with C# experience but they have 5 of Java and 3 of C++, I know they aren't going to have much difficulty picking up a new language. By the way, as you get further into your career, you will quickly realize that learning a new language often isn't a big deal. Learning all the libraries and idioms of the language is what takes tome.

When I'm looking at a junior position, I give a lot less weight to their experience. I really want to figure out of they have the capability to learn. Getting your CS (or whatever) degree is a good step in that direction, because it shows that you were able to learn something. If you have work experience in the CS field, great. Someone thought you were smart enough to hire. I'm going to throw some programming questions at you (maybe on paper, maybe on a whiteboard) and ask you to solve them in your favorite language. Yes, in the language of your choice. What I'm trying to see is if you can work your way through a problem, and I'll be able to follow enough your whatever language you pick to see whether you got the answer right or not.

Obviously if you know something about the technology the job will require, all the better. Spend your off hours boning up on the subjects so you will at least be able to recognize the important keywords they might throw at you.

To give you some more hope, I hired a guy who had some C experience but not a lot. It was for a junior C job. The guy was obviously smart, well spoken, and could reason through the problem. Unfortunately, he was still a bit weak on the C side. We said, "tell you what, work on your C, come back in a couple of weeks, and we'll try this again." He did, we asked him different questions (obviously), and he was definitely better. Not knock it out of the park better, but a definite improvement. We decided to hire him, and didn't regret it. He worked hard, and when he wasn't sure, he asked questions.

So the upshot of this long winded ramble is, if you want to change what you are working on, go for it. Especially this early in your career. Shoot for the jobs and see what happens. If you can, get some feedback on where you did well, and not so well. In the end, it will be worth it.