2 correction in the quote; slight change to wording for clarity
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Like pretty much every other software project, it was done under aggressive deadline and quality pressure. Fortunately a large archive of material from software project manager Howard W. “Bill” Tindall, Jr. is available here.

You can ifIf you sample the memos, you can get a very good sense of the normal conflict between time, features, and defects. It's worth noting that development proceeded over a number of years like the rest of the project.

Design of the system began in the second quarter of 1961, and NASA installed a Block I version in a spacecraft on September 22, 1965. Release of the original software (named CORONA) was in January 1966, with the first flight on August 25, 1966 60. Less than 3 years after that, designers achieved the final program objective (http://history.nasa.gov/computers/Ch2-5.html)

I can't find specific references to how the software was created, but given the date I can only assume that much of it was done on pen and paper, with "simulations" done manually. It seems there was a system for loading programs into the AGC with punch cards, presumably for "rapid" testing on the ground without the need to fabricate rope memory.

Like pretty much every other software project, it was done under aggressive deadline and quality pressure. Fortunately a large archive of material from software project manager Howard W. “Bill” Tindall, Jr. is available here.

You can if you sample the memos get a very good sense of the normal conflict between time, features, and defects. It's worth noting that development proceeded over a number of years like the rest of the project.

Design of the system began in the second quarter of 1961, and NASA installed a Block I version in a spacecraft on September 22, 1965. Release of the original software (named CORONA) was in January 1966, with the first flight on August 25, 1966 60. Less than 3 years after that, designers achieved the final program objective (http://history.nasa.gov/computers/Ch2-5.html)

I can't find specific references to how the software was created, but given the date I can only assume that much of it was done on pen and paper, with "simulations" done manually. It seems there was a system for loading programs into the AGC with punch cards, presumably for "rapid" testing on the ground without the need to fabricate rope memory.

Like pretty much every other software project, it was done under aggressive deadline and quality pressure. Fortunately a large archive of material from software project manager Howard W. “Bill” Tindall, Jr. is available here.

If you sample the memos, you can get a very good sense of the normal conflict between time, features, and defects. It's worth noting that development proceeded over a number of years like the rest of the project.

Design of the system began in the second quarter of 1961, and NASA installed a Block I version in a spacecraft on September 22, 1965. Release of the original software (named CORONA) was in January 1966, with the first flight on August 25, 1966. Less than 3 years after that, designers achieved the final program objective (http://history.nasa.gov/computers/Ch2-5.html)

I can't find specific references to how the software was created, but given the date I can only assume that much of it was done on pen and paper, with "simulations" done manually. It seems there was a system for loading programs into the AGC with punch cards, presumably for "rapid" testing on the ground without the need to fabricate rope memory.

1
source | link

Like pretty much every other software project, it was done under aggressive deadline and quality pressure. Fortunately a large archive of material from software project manager Howard W. “Bill” Tindall, Jr. is available here.

You can if you sample the memos get a very good sense of the normal conflict between time, features, and defects. It's worth noting that development proceeded over a number of years like the rest of the project.

Design of the system began in the second quarter of 1961, and NASA installed a Block I version in a spacecraft on September 22, 1965. Release of the original software (named CORONA) was in January 1966, with the first flight on August 25, 1966 60. Less than 3 years after that, designers achieved the final program objective (http://history.nasa.gov/computers/Ch2-5.html)

I can't find specific references to how the software was created, but given the date I can only assume that much of it was done on pen and paper, with "simulations" done manually. It seems there was a system for loading programs into the AGC with punch cards, presumably for "rapid" testing on the ground without the need to fabricate rope memory.