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You can do patching yourself if you know what you're doing. But if you script that, you'll definitively have a problem  : on each release you'll have to list every single changed files.

The goal of maven if to provide a full packaged delivery, so of course by default you'll have a 100mb war. This is the default behaviour because it's the easiest and the safest. But if you don't want to have always a 100MB delivery you can do the following  :

  1. Get all the jar inside your current war that aren't from your code
  2. Put them in the library folder of your web server
  3. Set all your dependencies to the scope "provided".

This is a way to go, but if you ever update one of those provided components and forget to upgrade it on the server, you may have a failure and will probably have some trouble tracking it back from the update of the library.

But personnaly iI consider that as long you don't have to upload 100MB yourself on each compilation for your own dev environment this doesn't worth any trouble, you're not supposed to deliver things that often so you can just wait 1a minute or two. I'll add this is why i use tomcat and not application server, iI don't have any conflicts of already embedded library in the server. JBOSSJBoss gave me a lot of trouble when iI wanted to use a more recent version of jackson on it.

You can do patching yourself if you know what you're doing. But if you script that, you'll definitively have a problem  : on each release you'll have to list every single changed files.

The goal of maven if to provide a full packaged delivery, so of course by default you'll have a 100mb war. This is the default behaviour because it's the easiest and the safest. But if you don't want to have always a 100MB delivery you can do the following  :

  1. Get all the jar inside your current war that aren't from your code
  2. Put them in the library folder of your web server
  3. Set all your dependencies to the scope "provided".

This is a way to go, but if you ever update one of those provided components and forget to upgrade it on the server, you may have a failure and will probably have some trouble tracking it back from the update of the library.

But personnaly i consider that as long you don't have to upload 100MB yourself on each compilation for your own dev environment this doesn't worth any trouble, you're not supposed to deliver things that often so you can just wait 1 minute or two. I'll add this is why i use tomcat and not application server, i don't have any conflicts of already embedded library in the server. JBOSS gave me a lot of trouble when i wanted to use a more recent version of jackson on it.

You can do patching yourself if you know what you're doing. But if you script that, you'll definitively have a problem: on each release you'll have to list every single changed files.

The goal of maven if to provide a full packaged delivery, so of course by default you'll have a 100mb war. This is the default behaviour because it's the easiest and the safest. But if you don't want to have always a 100MB delivery you can do the following:

  1. Get all the jar inside your current war that aren't from your code
  2. Put them in the library folder of your web server
  3. Set all your dependencies to the scope "provided".

This is a way to go, but if you ever update one of those provided components and forget to upgrade it on the server, you may have a failure and will probably have some trouble tracking it back from the update of the library.

But personnaly I consider that as long you don't have to upload 100MB yourself on each compilation for your own dev environment this doesn't worth any trouble, you're not supposed to deliver things that often so you can just wait a minute or two. I'll add this is why i use tomcat and not application server, I don't have any conflicts of already embedded library in the server. JBoss gave me a lot of trouble when I wanted to use a more recent version of jackson on it.

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source | link

You can do patching yourself if you know what you're doing. But if you script that, you'll definitively have a problem : on each release you'll have to list every single changed files.

The goal of maven if to provide a full packaged delivery, so of course by default you'll have a 100mb war. This is the default behaviour because it's the easiest and the safest. But if you don't want to have always a 100MB delivery you can do the following :

  1. Get all the jar inside your current war that aren't from your code
  2. Put them in the library folder of your web server
  3. Set all your dependencies to the scope "provided".

This is a way to go, but if you ever update one of those provided components and forget to upgrade it on the server, you may have a failure and will probably have some trouble tracking it back from the update of the library.

But personnaly i consider that as long you don't have to upload 100MB yourself on each compilation for your own dev environment this doesn't worth any trouble, you're not supposed to deliver things that often so you can just wait 1 minute or two. I'll add this is why i use tomcat and not application server, i don't have any conflicts of already embedded library in the server. JBOSS gave me a lot of trouble when i wanted to use a more recent version of jackson on it.