4 added 358 characters in body
source | link

You push items onto and pop them off of the top of the stack, regardless of how it is laid out in memory.

The stack terminology is intended to mirror a physical stack (of plates, in particular):

Stacks are often described by analogy to a spring-loaded stack of plates in a cafeteria. Clean plates are placed on top of the stack, pushing down any already there. When a plate is removed from the stack, the one below it pops up to become the new top (Wikipedia, Stack History)


As it pertains to exceptions, strictly speaking, an exception propagates down the stack, from the most recently called function to the least recently called function. ButGoogle "exception propagation," and one of the first few results shows it like this:

enter image description here

However, when someone says "propagates up the stack," we understand what they mean. So, we understand what they meandon't fuss over it. Whether it's up or down in their heads isn't as relevant as whether they ultimately mean "most recent" to "least recent" (or "in opposite order of invocation").

You push items onto and pop them off of the top of the stack, regardless of how it is laid out in memory.

The stack terminology is intended to mirror a physical stack (of plates, in particular):

Stacks are often described by analogy to a spring-loaded stack of plates in a cafeteria. Clean plates are placed on top of the stack, pushing down any already there. When a plate is removed from the stack, the one below it pops up to become the new top (Wikipedia, Stack History)


As it pertains to exceptions, strictly speaking, an exception propagates down the stack, from the most recently called function to the least recently called function. But, when someone says "propagates up the stack," we understand what they mean. Whether it's up or down in their heads isn't as relevant as whether they ultimately mean "most recent" to "least recent" (or "in opposite order of invocation").

You push items onto and pop them off of the top of the stack, regardless of how it is laid out in memory.

The stack terminology is intended to mirror a physical stack (of plates, in particular):

Stacks are often described by analogy to a spring-loaded stack of plates in a cafeteria. Clean plates are placed on top of the stack, pushing down any already there. When a plate is removed from the stack, the one below it pops up to become the new top (Wikipedia, Stack History)


As it pertains to exceptions, strictly speaking, an exception propagates down the stack, from the most recently called function to the least recently called function. Google "exception propagation," and one of the first few results shows it like this:

enter image description here

However, when someone says "propagates up the stack," we understand what they mean. So, we don't fuss over it. Whether it's up or down in their heads isn't as relevant as whether they ultimately mean "most recent" to "least recent" (or "in opposite order of invocation").

3 added 358 characters in body
source | link

You push items onto and pop them off of the top of the stack, regardless of how it is laid out in memory.

The stack terminology is intended to mirror a physical stack. You can't very easily manage a physical stack from the bottom.(of plates, in particular):

Stacks are often described by analogy to a spring-loaded stack of plates in a cafeteria. Clean plates are placed on top of the stack, pushing down any already there. When a plate is removed from the stack, the one below it pops up to become the new top (Wikipedia, Stack History)


StrictlyAs it pertains to exceptions, strictly speaking, an exception propagates down the stack, from the most recently called function to the least recently called function. But, when someone says "propagates up the stack," we understand what they mean. Whether it's up or down in their heads isn't as relevant as whether they ultimately mean "most recent" to "least recent" (or "in opposite order of invocation").

You push items onto and pop them off of the top of the stack, regardless of how it is laid out in memory.

The stack terminology is intended to mirror a physical stack. You can't very easily manage a physical stack from the bottom.


Strictly speaking, an exception propagates down the stack, from the most recently called function to the least recently called function. But, when someone says "propagates up the stack," we understand what they mean. Whether it's up or down in their heads isn't as relevant as whether they ultimately mean "most recent" to "least recent" (or "in opposite order of invocation").

You push items onto and pop them off of the top of the stack, regardless of how it is laid out in memory.

The stack terminology is intended to mirror a physical stack (of plates, in particular):

Stacks are often described by analogy to a spring-loaded stack of plates in a cafeteria. Clean plates are placed on top of the stack, pushing down any already there. When a plate is removed from the stack, the one below it pops up to become the new top (Wikipedia, Stack History)


As it pertains to exceptions, strictly speaking, an exception propagates down the stack, from the most recently called function to the least recently called function. But, when someone says "propagates up the stack," we understand what they mean. Whether it's up or down in their heads isn't as relevant as whether they ultimately mean "most recent" to "least recent" (or "in opposite order of invocation").

2 added 389 characters in body
source | link

You push items onto and pop them off of the top of the stack, regardless of how it is laid out in memory.

The stack terminology is intended to mirror a physical stack. You can't very easily manage a physical stack from the bottom.


Strictly speaking, an exception propagates down the stack, from the most recently called function to the least recently called function. But, when someone says "propagates up the stack," we understand what they mean. Whether it's up or down in their heads isn't as relevant as whether they ultimately mean "most recent" to "least recent" (or "in opposite order of invocation").

You push items onto and pop them off of the top of the stack, regardless of how it is laid out in memory.

You push items onto and pop them off of the top of the stack, regardless of how it is laid out in memory.

The stack terminology is intended to mirror a physical stack. You can't very easily manage a physical stack from the bottom.


Strictly speaking, an exception propagates down the stack, from the most recently called function to the least recently called function. But, when someone says "propagates up the stack," we understand what they mean. Whether it's up or down in their heads isn't as relevant as whether they ultimately mean "most recent" to "least recent" (or "in opposite order of invocation").

1
source | link