3 added 160 characters in body
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Remember the G. K. Chesterton's fence: do not take down a fence obstructing a road until you understand why it was built.

You can find the author(s) of the code and the comments in question, and consult them to obtain the understanding. You can look at the commit messages, email threads, or docs if they exist. Then you'll either be able to refactor the marked fragment, or will write down your knowledge in the comments so that the next person to maintain this code could make a more informed decision.

Your aim is to reach an understanding what the code does, and why it was marked with a warning back then, and what would happen if the warning were ignored.

Before that, I'd not touch the code which is marked "do not touch".

Remember the G. K. Chesterton's fence: do not take down a fence obstructing a road until you understand why it was built.

You can find the author(s) of the code and the comments in question, and consult them to obtain the understanding. You can look at the commit messages, email threads, or docs if they exist. Then you'll either be able to refactor the marked fragment, or will write down your knowledge in the comments so that the next person to maintain this code could make a more informed decision.

Before that, I'd not touch the code which is marked "do not touch".

Remember the G. K. Chesterton's fence: do not take down a fence obstructing a road until you understand why it was built.

You can find the author(s) of the code and the comments in question, and consult them to obtain the understanding. You can look at the commit messages, email threads, or docs if they exist. Then you'll either be able to refactor the marked fragment, or will write down your knowledge in the comments so that the next person to maintain this code could make a more informed decision.

Your aim is to reach an understanding what the code does, and why it was marked with a warning back then, and what would happen if the warning were ignored.

Before that, I'd not touch the code which is marked "do not touch".

2 added 62 characters in body
source | link

Remember the G. K. Chesterton's fencethe G. K. Chesterton's fence: do not take down a fence obstructing a road until you understand why it was built.

You can find the author(s) of the code and the comments in question, and consult them to obtain the understanding. You can look at the commit messages, email threads, or docs if they exist. Then you'll either be able to refactor the marked fragment, or will write down your knowledge in the comments so that the next person to maintain this code could make a more informed decision.

Before that, I'd not touch the code which is marked "do not touch".

Remember the G. K. Chesterton's fence: do not take down a fence obstructing a road until you understand why it was built.

You can find the author(s) of the code and the comments in question, and consult them to obtain the understanding. You can look at the commit messages, email threads, or docs if they exist. Then you'll either be able to refactor the marked fragment, or will write down your knowledge in the comments so that the next person to maintain this code could make a more informed decision.

Before that, I'd not touch the code which is marked "do not touch".

Remember the G. K. Chesterton's fence: do not take down a fence obstructing a road until you understand why it was built.

You can find the author(s) of the code and the comments in question, and consult them to obtain the understanding. You can look at the commit messages, email threads, or docs if they exist. Then you'll either be able to refactor the marked fragment, or will write down your knowledge in the comments so that the next person to maintain this code could make a more informed decision.

Before that, I'd not touch the code which is marked "do not touch".

1
source | link

Remember the G. K. Chesterton's fence: do not take down a fence obstructing a road until you understand why it was built.

You can find the author(s) of the code and the comments in question, and consult them to obtain the understanding. You can look at the commit messages, email threads, or docs if they exist. Then you'll either be able to refactor the marked fragment, or will write down your knowledge in the comments so that the next person to maintain this code could make a more informed decision.

Before that, I'd not touch the code which is marked "do not touch".