5 deleted 19 characters in body
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I typically use the -< "many" notation when writing fast on a whiteboard. It's useful there because we're just trying to sketch a general idea. Vagueness is sometimes helpful at this stage.

The difference between "many" vs. "zero or many" and "one or many"...

  • "many" -< is effectively the same as "0 or many" because we cannot assume a lower bound that is not stated. It's either obvious or vague depending on how your team understands it.

  • "zero or many" -0< is specific. It means that the number of related entities is >= 0.

  • "one or many" -|< means the number of related entities is strictly > 0.

btw: The "one" -|- notation is explicit. It means exactly one, and is relatively infrequent to use. If you want to write a vague version of "one" you write a line -- with no symbol at all at the end.

This is a bit like playground baseball. This is how it's played in my neighborhood. Is there an ISO committee is for this? Do we really care?

I typically use the -< "many" notation when writing fast on a whiteboard. It's useful there because we're just trying to sketch a general idea. Vagueness is sometimes helpful at this stage.

The difference between "many" vs. "zero or many" and "one or many"...

  • "many" -< is effectively same as "0 or many" because we cannot assume a lower bound that is not stated. It's either obvious or vague depending on how your team understands it.

  • "zero or many" -0< is specific. It means that the number of related entities is >= 0.

  • "one or many" -|< means the number of related entities is strictly > 0.

btw: The "one" -|- notation is explicit. It means exactly one, and is relatively infrequent to use. If you want to write a vague version of "one" you write a line -- with no symbol at all at the end.

This is a bit like playground baseball. This is how it's played in my neighborhood. Is there an ISO committee is for this? Do we really care?

I typically use the -< "many" notation when writing fast on a whiteboard. It's useful there because we're just trying to sketch a general idea. Vagueness is sometimes helpful at this stage.

The difference between "many" vs. "zero or many" and "one or many"...

  • "many" -< is effectively the same as "0 or many" because we cannot assume a lower bound that is not stated. It's either obvious or vague depending on how your team understands it.

  • "zero or many" -0< is specific. It means the number of related entities >= 0.

  • "one or many" -|< means the number of related entities > 0.

btw: The "one" -|- notation is explicit. It means exactly one, and is relatively infrequent to use. If you want to write a vague version of "one" you write a line -- with no symbol at all at the end.

This is a bit like playground baseball. This is how it's played in my neighborhood. Is there an ISO committee for this? Do we really care?

4 typo: `of` ~> `or`; grammar
source | link

I typically use the -< "many" notation when writing fast on a whiteboard. It's useful there because we're just trying to sketch a general idea. Vagueness is sometimes helpful at this stage.

The difference between "many" vs. "zero ofor many" and "one or many"...

  • "many" -< is effectively same as "0 or many" because we cannot assume a lower bound that is not stated. It's either obvious or vague depending on how your team understands it.

  • "zero or many" -0< is specific. It means that the number of related entities is >= 0.

  • "one or many" -|< means the number of related entities is strictly > 0.

btw: The "one" -|- notation is explicit. It means exactly one, and is relatively infrequent to use. If you want to write a vague version of "one" you write a line -- with no symbol at all at the end.

This is a bit like playground baseball. This is how it's played in my neighborhood. Is there an ISO committee is for this? Do we really care?

I typically use the -< "many" notation when writing fast on a whiteboard. It's useful there because we're just trying to sketch a general idea. Vagueness is sometimes helpful at this stage.

The difference between "many" vs. "zero of many" and "one or many"...

  • "many" -< is effectively same as "0 or many" because we cannot assume a lower bound that is not stated. It's either obvious or vague depending how your team understands it.

  • "zero or many" -0< is specific means the number of related entities is >= 0.

  • "one or many" -|< means number of related entities > 0.

btw: The "one" -|- notation is explicit. It means exactly one, and is relatively infrequent to use. If you want to write a vague version of "one" you write a line -- with no symbol at all at the end.

This is a bit like playground baseball. This is how it's played in my neighborhood. Is there an ISO committee is for this? Do we really care?

I typically use the -< "many" notation when writing fast on a whiteboard. It's useful there because we're just trying to sketch a general idea. Vagueness is sometimes helpful at this stage.

The difference between "many" vs. "zero or many" and "one or many"...

  • "many" -< is effectively same as "0 or many" because we cannot assume a lower bound that is not stated. It's either obvious or vague depending on how your team understands it.

  • "zero or many" -0< is specific. It means that the number of related entities is >= 0.

  • "one or many" -|< means the number of related entities is strictly > 0.

btw: The "one" -|- notation is explicit. It means exactly one, and is relatively infrequent to use. If you want to write a vague version of "one" you write a line -- with no symbol at all at the end.

This is a bit like playground baseball. This is how it's played in my neighborhood. Is there an ISO committee is for this? Do we really care?

3 Make more readable
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I typically use the -<-< "many" notation when writing fast on a whiteboard. It's useful there because we're just trying to sketch a general idea. Vagueness is sometimes helpful at this stage.

The difference between "many" vs. "zero of many" and "one or many"...

  • "many" -<-< is effectively same as "0 or many" because we cannot assume a lower bound that is not stated. It's either obvious or vague depending how your team understands it.

  • "zero or many" -0<-0< is specific means the number of related entities is >= 0.

  • "one or many" -|<-|< means number of related entities > 0.

btw: The "one" -|--|- notation is explicit. It means exactly one, and is relatively infrequent to use. If you want to write a vague version of "one" you write a line ---- with no symbol at all at the end.

This is a bit like playground baseball. This is how it's played in my neighborhood. Is there an ISO committee is for this? Do we really care?

I typically use the -< "many" notation when writing fast on a whiteboard. It's useful there because we're just trying to sketch a general idea. Vagueness is sometimes helpful at this stage.

The difference between "many" vs. "zero of many" and "one or many"...

  • "many" -< is effectively same as "0 or many" because we cannot assume a lower bound that is not stated. It's either obvious or vague depending how your team understands it.

  • "zero or many" -0< is specific means the number of related entities is >= 0.

  • "one or many" -|< means number of related entities > 0.

btw: The "one" -|- notation is explicit. It means exactly one, and is relatively infrequent to use. If you want to write a vague version of "one" you write a line -- with no symbol at all at the end.

This is a bit like playground baseball. This is how it's played in my neighborhood. Is there an ISO committee is for this? Do we really care?

I typically use the -< "many" notation when writing fast on a whiteboard. It's useful there because we're just trying to sketch a general idea. Vagueness is sometimes helpful at this stage.

The difference between "many" vs. "zero of many" and "one or many"...

  • "many" -< is effectively same as "0 or many" because we cannot assume a lower bound that is not stated. It's either obvious or vague depending how your team understands it.

  • "zero or many" -0< is specific means the number of related entities is >= 0.

  • "one or many" -|< means number of related entities > 0.

btw: The "one" -|- notation is explicit. It means exactly one, and is relatively infrequent to use. If you want to write a vague version of "one" you write a line -- with no symbol at all at the end.

This is a bit like playground baseball. This is how it's played in my neighborhood. Is there an ISO committee is for this? Do we really care?

2 deleted 19 characters in body
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