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Using exceptions as flow control. Sort of similar to this answerthis answer, but different.

Swallowing exceptions is bad form because it introduces mysterious, hard to find bugs in code. Using exceptions as flow control, on the other hand, is bad because it makes the code far more inefficient than it could be, and is conceptually sloppy.

Exception handling should only be used to handle truly exceptional (duh), unforeseen scenarios, not things like a user typing in an alphabetic character where a number is expected. This kind of exception abuse is extremely common among bad programmers in the Java world.

Using exceptions as flow control. Sort of similar to this answer, but different.

Swallowing exceptions is bad form because it introduces mysterious, hard to find bugs in code. Using exceptions as flow control, on the other hand, is bad because it makes the code far more inefficient than it could be, and is conceptually sloppy.

Exception handling should only be used to handle truly exceptional (duh), unforeseen scenarios, not things like a user typing in an alphabetic character where a number is expected. This kind of exception abuse is extremely common among bad programmers in the Java world.

Using exceptions as flow control. Sort of similar to this answer, but different.

Swallowing exceptions is bad form because it introduces mysterious, hard to find bugs in code. Using exceptions as flow control, on the other hand, is bad because it makes the code far more inefficient than it could be, and is conceptually sloppy.

Exception handling should only be used to handle truly exceptional (duh), unforeseen scenarios, not things like a user typing in an alphabetic character where a number is expected. This kind of exception abuse is extremely common among bad programmers in the Java world.

2 deleted 12 characters in body
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Using exceptions as flow control. Sort of similar to this answer, but also subtly different.

Swallowing exceptions is bad form because it introduces mysterious, hard to find bugs in code. Using exceptions as flow control, on the other hand, is bad because it makes the code far more inefficient than it could be, and is conceptually sloppy.

Exception handling should only be used to handle truly exceptional (duh), unforeseen scenarios, not things like a user typing in an alphabetic character where a number is expected. This kind of exception abuse is extremely common among bad programmers in the Java world.

Using exceptions as flow control. Sort of similar to this answer, but also subtly different.

Swallowing exceptions is bad form because it introduces mysterious, hard to find bugs in code. Using exceptions as flow control, on the other hand, is bad because it makes the code far more inefficient than it could be, and is conceptually sloppy.

Exception handling should only be used to handle truly exceptional (duh), unforeseen scenarios, not things like a user typing in an alphabetic character where a number is expected. This kind of exception abuse is extremely common among bad programmers in the Java world.

Using exceptions as flow control. Sort of similar to this answer, but different.

Swallowing exceptions is bad form because it introduces mysterious, hard to find bugs in code. Using exceptions as flow control, on the other hand, is bad because it makes the code far more inefficient than it could be, and is conceptually sloppy.

Exception handling should only be used to handle truly exceptional (duh), unforeseen scenarios, not things like a user typing in an alphabetic character where a number is expected. This kind of exception abuse is extremely common among bad programmers in the Java world.

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source | link

Using exceptions as flow control. Sort of similar to this answer, but also subtly different.

Swallowing exceptions is bad form because it introduces mysterious, hard to find bugs in code. Using exceptions as flow control, on the other hand, is bad because it makes the code far more inefficient than it could be, and is conceptually sloppy.

Exception handling should only be used to handle truly exceptional (duh), unforeseen scenarios, not things like a user typing in an alphabetic character where a number is expected. This kind of exception abuse is extremely common among bad programmers in the Java world.