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Well, first of all, I would suggest that adopting good coding practices isn't fudging... The trick is understanding the purpose of each practice and how to properly implement it.

Rapid application development environments are seductive, because you can get a lot done in a really short time. I built an entire accounting system in Access once. But you said it yourself: you can't take an application like that to the web without a rewrite, and the tools you need there are really different.

There are reasons why nobody uses visual designersdesign tools like Access or Visual Basic anymore. They tend to insulate you from the code that really accomplishes something. Access is a fine tool, but it requires the very thing that web applications are specifically designed to avoid: installation. Customization of its appearance can be difficult; even if you don't need it on the web, an Access application will always look very much like any other Access application. Most folks who write their first Access application don't know enough to write a good application, and Access makes it easy to write a bad one.

So now you're resigned to learning a new technology to get your application on the web. Should you build it the right way from the start? Of course. But learning a new development environment and philosophy is like learning any other thing; you have to slop it up for awhile to get things right.

That's why I think you've posed a false dichotomy. Nobody learns all of the "best practices" first. They learn them as they go. But to be productive in any OOP language, I think you'll need to know some OOP, or at least how classes fundamentally work.

For what it's worth, I don't think PHP is your best choice. PHP is attractive because it is "shallow," meaning you don't have to know a lot to write a working program. Best practices are left largely up to the developer, which means that PHP is not going to help you write "good" programs. This isn't necessary a bad thing, but it does mean that, like Access, you may also be eventually ditching PHP for a more robust platform.

Well, first of all, I would suggest that adopting good coding practices isn't fudging... The trick is understanding the purpose of each practice and how to properly implement it.

Rapid application development environments are seductive, because you can get a lot done in a really short time. I built an entire accounting system in Access once. But you said it yourself: you can't take an application like that to the web without a rewrite, and the tools you need there are really different.

There are reasons why nobody uses visual designers anymore. They tend to insulate you from the code that really accomplishes something. Access is a fine tool, but it requires the very thing that web applications are specifically designed to avoid: installation. Customization of its appearance can be difficult; even if you don't need it on the web, an Access application will always look very much like any other Access application. Most folks who write their first Access application don't know enough to write a good application, and Access makes it easy to write a bad one.

So now you're resigned to learning a new technology to get your application on the web. Should you build it the right way from the start? Of course. But learning a new development environment and philosophy is like learning any other thing; you have to slop it up for awhile to get things right.

That's why I think you've posed a false dichotomy. Nobody learns all of the "best practices" first. They learn them as they go. But to be productive in any OOP language, I think you'll need to know some OOP, or at least how classes fundamentally work.

For what it's worth, I don't think PHP is your best choice. PHP is attractive because it is "shallow," meaning you don't have to know a lot to write a working program. Best practices are left largely up to the developer, which means that PHP is not going to help you write "good" programs. This isn't necessary a bad thing, but it does mean that, like Access, you may also be eventually ditching PHP for a more robust platform.

Well, first of all, I would suggest that adopting good coding practices isn't fudging... The trick is understanding the purpose of each practice and how to properly implement it.

Rapid application development environments are seductive, because you can get a lot done in a really short time. I built an entire accounting system in Access once. But you said it yourself: you can't take an application like that to the web without a rewrite, and the tools you need there are really different.

There are reasons why nobody uses visual design tools like Access or Visual Basic anymore. They tend to insulate you from the code that really accomplishes something. Access is a fine tool, but it requires the very thing that web applications are specifically designed to avoid: installation. Customization of its appearance can be difficult; even if you don't need it on the web, an Access application will always look very much like any other Access application. Most folks who write their first Access application don't know enough to write a good application, and Access makes it easy to write a bad one.

So now you're resigned to learning a new technology to get your application on the web. Should you build it the right way from the start? Of course. But learning a new development environment and philosophy is like learning any other thing; you have to slop it up for awhile to get things right.

That's why I think you've posed a false dichotomy. Nobody learns all of the "best practices" first. They learn them as they go. But to be productive in any OOP language, I think you'll need to know some OOP, or at least how classes fundamentally work.

For what it's worth, I don't think PHP is your best choice. PHP is attractive because it is "shallow," meaning you don't have to know a lot to write a working program. Best practices are left largely up to the developer, which means that PHP is not going to help you write "good" programs. This isn't necessary a bad thing, but it does mean that, like Access, you may also be eventually ditching PHP for a more robust platform.

2 added 145 characters in body
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Well, first of all, I would suggest that adopting good coding practices isn't fudging... The trick is understanding the purpose of each practice and how to properly implement it.

Rapid application development environments are seductive, because you can get a lot done in a really short time. I built an entire accounting system in Access once. But you said it yourself: you can't take an application like that to the web without a rewrite, and the tools you need there are really different.

There are reasons why nobody uses visual designers anymore. They tend to insulate you from the code that really accomplishes something. Access is a fine tool, but it requires the very thing that web applications are specifically designed to avoid: installation. Customization of its appearance can be difficult; even if you don't need it on the web, an Access application will always look very much like any other Access application. Most folks who write their first Access application don't know enough to write a good application, and Access makes it easy to write a bad one.

So now you're resigned to learning a new technology to get your application on the web. Should you build it the right way from the start? Of course. But learning a new development environment and philosophy is like learning any other thing; you have to slop it up for awhile to get things right.

That's why I think you've posed a false dichotomy. Nobody learns all of the "best practices" first. They learn them as they go. But to be productive in any OOP language, I think you'll need to know some OOP, or at least how classes fundamentally work.

For what it's worth, I don't think PHP is your best choice. PHP is attractive because it is "shallow," meaning you don't have to know a lot to write a working program. Best practices are left largely up to the developer, which means that PHP is not going to help you write "good" programs. This isn't necessary a bad thing, but it does mean that, like Access, you may also be eventually ditching PHP for a more robust platform.

Well, first of all, I would suggest that adopting good coding practices isn't fudging... The trick is understanding the purpose of each practice and how to properly implement it.

Rapid application development environments are seductive, because you can get a lot done in a really short time. I built an entire accounting system in Access once. But you said it yourself: you can't take an application like that to the web without a rewrite, and the tools you need there are really different.

There are reasons why nobody uses visual designers anymore. They tend to insulate you from the code that really accomplishes something. Access is a fine tool, but it requires the very thing that web applications are specifically designed to avoid: installation. Customization of its appearance can be difficult; even if you don't need it on the web, an Access application will always look very much like any other Access application.

So now you're resigned to learning a new technology to get your application on the web. Should you build it the right way from the start? Of course. But learning a new development environment and philosophy is like learning any other thing; you have to slop it up for awhile to get things right.

That's why I think you've posed a false dichotomy. Nobody learns all of the "best practices" first. They learn them as they go. But to be productive in any OOP language, I think you'll need to know some OOP, or at least how classes fundamentally work.

For what it's worth, I don't think PHP is your best choice. PHP is attractive because it is "shallow," meaning you don't have to know a lot to write a working program. Best practices are left largely up to the developer, which means that PHP is not going to help you write "good" programs. This isn't necessary a bad thing, but it does mean that, like Access, you may also be eventually ditching PHP for a more robust platform.

Well, first of all, I would suggest that adopting good coding practices isn't fudging... The trick is understanding the purpose of each practice and how to properly implement it.

Rapid application development environments are seductive, because you can get a lot done in a really short time. I built an entire accounting system in Access once. But you said it yourself: you can't take an application like that to the web without a rewrite, and the tools you need there are really different.

There are reasons why nobody uses visual designers anymore. They tend to insulate you from the code that really accomplishes something. Access is a fine tool, but it requires the very thing that web applications are specifically designed to avoid: installation. Customization of its appearance can be difficult; even if you don't need it on the web, an Access application will always look very much like any other Access application. Most folks who write their first Access application don't know enough to write a good application, and Access makes it easy to write a bad one.

So now you're resigned to learning a new technology to get your application on the web. Should you build it the right way from the start? Of course. But learning a new development environment and philosophy is like learning any other thing; you have to slop it up for awhile to get things right.

That's why I think you've posed a false dichotomy. Nobody learns all of the "best practices" first. They learn them as they go. But to be productive in any OOP language, I think you'll need to know some OOP, or at least how classes fundamentally work.

For what it's worth, I don't think PHP is your best choice. PHP is attractive because it is "shallow," meaning you don't have to know a lot to write a working program. Best practices are left largely up to the developer, which means that PHP is not going to help you write "good" programs. This isn't necessary a bad thing, but it does mean that, like Access, you may also be eventually ditching PHP for a more robust platform.

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source | link

Well, first of all, I would suggest that adopting good coding practices isn't fudging... The trick is understanding the purpose of each practice and how to properly implement it.

Rapid application development environments are seductive, because you can get a lot done in a really short time. I built an entire accounting system in Access once. But you said it yourself: you can't take an application like that to the web without a rewrite, and the tools you need there are really different.

There are reasons why nobody uses visual designers anymore. They tend to insulate you from the code that really accomplishes something. Access is a fine tool, but it requires the very thing that web applications are specifically designed to avoid: installation. Customization of its appearance can be difficult; even if you don't need it on the web, an Access application will always look very much like any other Access application.

So now you're resigned to learning a new technology to get your application on the web. Should you build it the right way from the start? Of course. But learning a new development environment and philosophy is like learning any other thing; you have to slop it up for awhile to get things right.

That's why I think you've posed a false dichotomy. Nobody learns all of the "best practices" first. They learn them as they go. But to be productive in any OOP language, I think you'll need to know some OOP, or at least how classes fundamentally work.

For what it's worth, I don't think PHP is your best choice. PHP is attractive because it is "shallow," meaning you don't have to know a lot to write a working program. Best practices are left largely up to the developer, which means that PHP is not going to help you write "good" programs. This isn't necessary a bad thing, but it does mean that, like Access, you may also be eventually ditching PHP for a more robust platform.