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Let me take your question to extreme by using an analogy.

Should you care for clean operating room or the one where instruments works right? You can sprinkle chlorine all over, take our all those ugly catheters and wires away: The operating room will be quite clean, but faulty instruments will make both surgeon and patient unhappy.

I'd taken it to another perspective. Clean code belongs to the form of the code while bug-free behavior is directly related to the solution of the problem.

As Clean Architecture: A Craftsman's Guide to Software Structure and Design, First Edition by Robert C. Martin says (note, he also equates design and architecture):

"The goal of software architecture is to minimize the human resources required to build and maintain the required system."

I can only add, that it's almost impossible to foresee with 100% accuracy how the system will be developed with time, what new cases will be prevalent. But if the architecture is well-thought, developers understand the domain, then system's evolution will be smooth providing for both clean architecture, code and minimizing bugs. Of course, practicality is in the balance of the predicting expected system development directions (long-term) and acute business needs (short-term).

I guess, the answer is: care about architecture and both goodies you are trying to counterpose.

Let me take your question to extreme by using an analogy.

Should you care for clean operating room or the one where instruments works right? You can sprinkle chlorine all over, take our all those ugly catheters and wires away: The operating room will be quite clean, but faulty instruments will make both surgeon and patient unhappy.

I'd taken it to another perspective. Clean code belongs to the form of the code while bug-free behavior is directly related to the solution of the problem.

As Clean Architecture: A Craftsman's Guide to Software Structure and Design, First Edition by Robert C. Martin says (note, he also equates design and architecture):

"The goal of software architecture is to minimize the human resources required to build and maintain the required system."

I can only add, that it's almost impossible to foresee with 100% accuracy how the system will be developed with time, what new cases will be prevalent. But if the architecture is well-thought, developers understand the domain, then system's evolution will be smooth providing for both clean architecture, code and minimizing bugs. Of course, practicality is in the balance of the predicting expected system development directions (long-term) and acute business needs (short-term).

Let me take your question to extreme by using an analogy.

Should you care for clean operating room or the one where instruments works right? You can sprinkle chlorine all over, take our all those ugly catheters and wires away: The operating room will be quite clean, but faulty instruments will make both surgeon and patient unhappy.

I'd taken it to another perspective. Clean code belongs to the form of the code while bug-free behavior is directly related to the solution of the problem.

As Clean Architecture: A Craftsman's Guide to Software Structure and Design, First Edition by Robert C. Martin says (note, he also equates design and architecture):

"The goal of software architecture is to minimize the human resources required to build and maintain the required system."

I can only add, that it's almost impossible to foresee with 100% accuracy how the system will be developed with time, what new cases will be prevalent. But if the architecture is well-thought, developers understand the domain, then system's evolution will be smooth providing for both clean architecture, code and minimizing bugs. Of course, practicality is in the balance of the predicting expected system development directions (long-term) and acute business needs (short-term).

I guess, the answer is: care about architecture and both goodies you are trying to counterpose.

1
source | link

Let me take your question to extreme by using an analogy.

Should you care for clean operating room or the one where instruments works right? You can sprinkle chlorine all over, take our all those ugly catheters and wires away: The operating room will be quite clean, but faulty instruments will make both surgeon and patient unhappy.

I'd taken it to another perspective. Clean code belongs to the form of the code while bug-free behavior is directly related to the solution of the problem.

As Clean Architecture: A Craftsman's Guide to Software Structure and Design, First Edition by Robert C. Martin says (note, he also equates design and architecture):

"The goal of software architecture is to minimize the human resources required to build and maintain the required system."

I can only add, that it's almost impossible to foresee with 100% accuracy how the system will be developed with time, what new cases will be prevalent. But if the architecture is well-thought, developers understand the domain, then system's evolution will be smooth providing for both clean architecture, code and minimizing bugs. Of course, practicality is in the balance of the predicting expected system development directions (long-term) and acute business needs (short-term).