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See Steve Mcconnel'  The Business Case for Better Software Practices and Software Software Development’s Development’s Low Hanging Fruit. 

The first shows productivity, schedule and defect improvement.

Companies that invest in post-gold rush development practices have found that their investments pay off. In 1994, James Herbsleb reported that the average “business value” (roughly the same as return on investment) for 13 organizations that had taken on systematic improvement programs was about 5 to 1, with the best organizations realizing returns of 9 to 1. In 1995, Neil C. Olsen reported similar returns for organizations that had made significant investments in staffing, training, and work environments. In 1997, Rini van Solingen reported that the average ROI was 7 to 1 with the best organization realizing returns of 19 to 1. In 2000, Capers Jones reported that the return on investment from process improvement could easily go into double digits (i.e., returns greater than 10 to 1). A recent analysis by Watts Humphrey found that the ROI for improved software practices could be in the neighborhood of 5 to 1 or better...

The second has "LHF [low handing fruit] that will Not be Resisted by Upper Management" that lists Coding StandardsCoding Standards, Daily Build and Smoke TestDaily Build and Test-First CodingSmoke Test and Test-First Coding, three issues you asked about.

Steve McConnell describes strategies that produce improvements in schedule, quality, and development costs in the short term. McConnell identifies the specific technical practices that produce the highest returns on investment, the lowest risks of adoption, and the shortest paths to more successful software projects. McConnell describes the theory behind short-term vs. long-term improvement strategies and presents tips for maximizing your chances of success in adopting these strategies...

See Steve Mcconnel'The Business Case for Better Software Practices and Software Software Development’s Development’s Low Hanging Fruit. The first shows productivity, schedule and defect improvement. The second has "LHF [low handing fruit] that will Not be Resisted by Upper Management" lists Coding Standards, Daily Build and Smoke Test and Test-First Coding, three issues you asked about.

See Steve Mcconnel'  The Business Case for Better Software Practices and Software Development’s Low Hanging Fruit. 

The first shows productivity, schedule and defect improvement.

Companies that invest in post-gold rush development practices have found that their investments pay off. In 1994, James Herbsleb reported that the average “business value” (roughly the same as return on investment) for 13 organizations that had taken on systematic improvement programs was about 5 to 1, with the best organizations realizing returns of 9 to 1. In 1995, Neil C. Olsen reported similar returns for organizations that had made significant investments in staffing, training, and work environments. In 1997, Rini van Solingen reported that the average ROI was 7 to 1 with the best organization realizing returns of 19 to 1. In 2000, Capers Jones reported that the return on investment from process improvement could easily go into double digits (i.e., returns greater than 10 to 1). A recent analysis by Watts Humphrey found that the ROI for improved software practices could be in the neighborhood of 5 to 1 or better...

The second has "LHF [low handing fruit] that will Not be Resisted by Upper Management" that lists Coding Standards, Daily Build and Smoke Test and Test-First Coding, three issues you asked about.

Steve McConnell describes strategies that produce improvements in schedule, quality, and development costs in the short term. McConnell identifies the specific technical practices that produce the highest returns on investment, the lowest risks of adoption, and the shortest paths to more successful software projects. McConnell describes the theory behind short-term vs. long-term improvement strategies and presents tips for maximizing your chances of success in adopting these strategies...

2 replaced first link. Explained it.
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FromSee Steve Mcconnel's Construx The Business Case for The Business Case for Better Software Better Software PracticesMcconnel'The Business Case for Better Software Practices and Software Software Development’s Development’s Low Hanging Fruit. From the latterThe first shows productivity, schedule and defect improvement. The second has "LHF [low handing fruit] that will Not be Resisted by Upper Management" lists Coding Standards, Daily Build and Smoke Test and Test-First Coding, three issuesissues you asked about.

From Steve Mcconnel's Construx The Business Case for The Business Case for Better Software Better Software Practices and Software Software Development’s Development’s Low Hanging Fruit. From the latter "LHF that will Not be Resisted by Upper Management" lists Coding Standards, Daily Build and Smoke Test and Test-First Coding, three issues you asked about.

See Steve Mcconnel'The Business Case for Better Software Practices and Software Software Development’s Development’s Low Hanging Fruit. The first shows productivity, schedule and defect improvement. The second has "LHF [low handing fruit] that will Not be Resisted by Upper Management" lists Coding Standards, Daily Build and Smoke Test and Test-First Coding, three issues you asked about.

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From Steve Mcconnel's Construx The Business Case for The Business Case for Better Software Better Software Practices and Software Software Development’s Development’s Low Hanging Fruit. From the latter "LHF that will Not be Resisted by Upper Management" lists Coding Standards, Daily Build and Smoke Test and Test-First Coding, three issues you asked about.