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I always try to clean up as I go. I am not done until the code is clean. The problem with technical debt is that most people do not understand it. The best way to tackle it is to not accumulate any of it. If your managers trust your developers to decide how to solve a problem you can make code hygiene part of every programming task. If you never check in bad code you do not accumulate debt. If you also follow the Boy Scout Rule (always leave code cleaner thatthan you found it) your existing debt will vanish slowly.

I don't see refactoring as a task separate from implementing features. It is an integral part of it.

I always try to clean up as I go. I am not done until the code is clean. The problem with technical debt is that most people do not understand it. The best way to tackle it is to not accumulate any of it. If your managers trust your developers to decide how to solve a problem you can make code hygiene part of every programming task. If you never check in bad code you do not accumulate debt. If you also follow the Boy Scout Rule (always leave code cleaner that you found it) your existing debt will vanish slowly.

I don't see refactoring as a task separate from implementing features. It is integral part of it.

I always try to clean up as I go. I am not done until the code is clean. The problem with technical debt is that most people do not understand it. The best way to tackle it is to not accumulate any of it. If your managers trust your developers to decide how to solve a problem you can make code hygiene part of every programming task. If you never check in bad code you do not accumulate debt. If you also follow the Boy Scout Rule (always leave code cleaner than you found it) your existing debt will vanish slowly.

I don't see refactoring as a task separate from implementing features. It is an integral part of it.

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I always try to clean up as I go. I am not done until the code is clean. The problem with technical debt is that most people do not understand it. The best way to tackle it is to not accumulate any of it. If your managers trust your developers to decide how to solve a problem you can make code hygiene part of every programming task. If you never check in bad code you do not accumulate debt. If you also follow the Boy Scout Rule (always leave code cleaner that you found it) your existing debt will vanish slowly.

I don't see refactoring as a task separate from implementing features. It is integral part of it.