2 added 13 characters in body; added 12 characters in body; added 12 characters in body
source | link

If the employees agreed that their work machine belongs to the company and is subject to search, then yes, this is legal. For proof, archival of the files would most likely be necessary.

As for how to actually find the material. You could:

  1. First and foremost, scan file names for a certain set of words (porn, lesbians, etc.)
  2. Scan text documents for the same set of words
  3. For images, you could find the average color of the image, and if that color happens to be within a range that most would refer to as 'flesh' colored, then flag the image (someone double checking these flagged images will most likely be necessary). Wouldn't want to report someone for an image that ends up being a family photo from the beach.

If you scan the files as they're entering the computer (e.g. have the program loaded on every work machine that logsand log flagged cases to a central database), then I don't think it would be too obtrusive (other than the blatant distrust the employer clearly has for their employees).

With the video files, I'm not 100% sure. Possibly a similar approach as with the image scanning (choose random frames and scan for a certain level of 'flesh' color).

Scanning audio files seems like it would get into speech recognition, which is a whole 'nother can of worms. Scanning the file name, however, would be easy and could be done as with the documents, images, and video.

If the employees agreed that their work machine belongs to the company and is subject to search, then yes, this is legal. For proof, archival would most likely be necessary.

As for how to actually find the material. You could:

  1. First and foremost, scan file names for a certain set of words (porn, lesbians, etc.)
  2. Scan text documents for the same set of words
  3. For images, you could find the average color of the image, and if that color happens to be within a range that most would refer to as 'flesh' colored, then flag the image (someone double checking these flagged images will most likely be necessary). Wouldn't want to report someone for an image that ends up being a family photo from the beach.

If you scan the files as they're entering the computer (e.g. have the program loaded on every work machine that logs to a central database), then I don't think it would be too obtrusive (other than the blatant distrust the employer clearly has for their employees).

With the video files, I'm not 100% sure. Possibly a similar approach as with the image scanning (choose random frames and scan for a certain level of 'flesh' color).

Scanning audio files seems like it would get into speech recognition, which is a whole 'nother can of worms. Scanning the file name, however, would be easy and could be done as with the images and video.

If the employees agreed that their work machine belongs to the company and is subject to search, then yes, this is legal. For proof, archival of the files would most likely be necessary.

As for how to actually find the material. You could:

  1. First and foremost, scan file names for a certain set of words (porn, lesbians, etc.)
  2. Scan text documents for the same set of words
  3. For images, you could find the average color of the image, and if that color happens to be within a range that most would refer to as 'flesh' colored, then flag the image (someone double checking these flagged images will most likely be necessary). Wouldn't want to report someone for an image that ends up being a family photo from the beach.

If you scan the files as they're entering the computer (e.g. have the program loaded on every work machine and log flagged cases to a central database), then I don't think it would be too obtrusive (other than the blatant distrust the employer clearly has for their employees).

With the video files, I'm not 100% sure. Possibly a similar approach as with the image scanning (choose random frames and scan for a certain level of 'flesh' color).

Scanning audio files seems like it would get into speech recognition, which is a whole 'nother can of worms. Scanning the file name, however, would be easy and could be done as with the documents, images, and video.

1
source | link

If the employees agreed that their work machine belongs to the company and is subject to search, then yes, this is legal. For proof, archival would most likely be necessary.

As for how to actually find the material. You could:

  1. First and foremost, scan file names for a certain set of words (porn, lesbians, etc.)
  2. Scan text documents for the same set of words
  3. For images, you could find the average color of the image, and if that color happens to be within a range that most would refer to as 'flesh' colored, then flag the image (someone double checking these flagged images will most likely be necessary). Wouldn't want to report someone for an image that ends up being a family photo from the beach.

If you scan the files as they're entering the computer (e.g. have the program loaded on every work machine that logs to a central database), then I don't think it would be too obtrusive (other than the blatant distrust the employer clearly has for their employees).

With the video files, I'm not 100% sure. Possibly a similar approach as with the image scanning (choose random frames and scan for a certain level of 'flesh' color).

Scanning audio files seems like it would get into speech recognition, which is a whole 'nother can of worms. Scanning the file name, however, would be easy and could be done as with the images and video.