Bounty Ended with 50 reputation awarded by Anto
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There is a real need for a systems language with more modern features. C and C++ are too bound by legacy code and backwards compatibility here to improve much. That said, I don't think Go fulfills that role in its current form. Its design is too minimalist. While its concurrency model is exciting, it brings few other features from higher level languages to the systems world. (Last time I checked, which was admittedly a while ago, it didn't even have exceptions.) Furthermore, at least to the extent that the Computer Language Benchmark Game is a good measure (it's admittedly a very rough indicator), it's not nearly as fast as a "real" systems language needs to be.

I think the language with the best chance to fill the void of a more modern systems language is D. D is technically much stronger than Go but politically weaker. It's not backed by a major corporation. What it really needs is some libraries (this is rapidly being addressed now that the language spec is stable) and a killer app.

There is a real need for a systems language with more modern features. C and C++ are too bound by legacy code and backwards compatibility here to improve much. That said, I don't think Go fulfills that role in its current form. Its design is too minimalist. While its concurrency model is exciting, it brings few other features from higher level languages to the systems world. Furthermore, at least to the extent that the Computer Language Benchmark Game is a good measure (it's admittedly a very rough indicator), it's not nearly as fast as a "real" systems language needs to be.

I think the language with the best chance to fill the void of a more modern systems language is D. D is technically much stronger than Go but politically weaker. It's not backed by a major corporation. What it really needs is some libraries (this is rapidly being addressed now that the language spec is stable) and a killer app.

There is a real need for a systems language with more modern features. C and C++ are too bound by legacy code and backwards compatibility here to improve much. That said, I don't think Go fulfills that role in its current form. Its design is too minimalist. While its concurrency model is exciting, it brings few other features from higher level languages to the systems world. (Last time I checked, which was admittedly a while ago, it didn't even have exceptions.) Furthermore, at least to the extent that the Computer Language Benchmark Game is a good measure (it's admittedly a very rough indicator), it's not nearly as fast as a "real" systems language needs to be.

I think the language with the best chance to fill the void of a more modern systems language is D. D is technically much stronger than Go but politically weaker. It's not backed by a major corporation. What it really needs is some libraries (this is rapidly being addressed now that the language spec is stable) and a killer app.

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There is a real need for a systems language with more modern features. C and C++ are too bound by legacy code and backwards compatibility here to improve much. That said, I don't think Go fulfills that role in its current form. Its design is too minimalist. While its concurrency model is exciting, it brings few other features from higher level languages to the systems world. Furthermore, at least to the extent that the Computer Language Benchmark Game is a good measure (it's admittedly a very rough indicator), it's not nearly as fast as a "real" systems language needs to be.

I think the language with the best chance to fill the void of a more modern systems language is D. D is technically much stronger than Go but politically weaker. It's not backed by a major corporation. What it really needs is some libraries (this is rapidly being addressed now that the language spec is stable) and a killer app.