2 Added some more context
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Here's my spin:

It's the effort and continual strive to self improve that you don't always see in everyone else around you.

It's the outlook that what you've just built can always be better, could always be improved.

It's humility in that even though a solution is elegant it could always be simplified.

To be honest, these are the qualities that make someone great, not just in programming, but in just about any career when viewed through a different lense.

It's one of the many reasons truly fantastic people start with a fantastic attitude and outlook first and foremost. They tend to rise above the norm and bubble up to the top of a team if they're not surrounded by like minded people.

Others, may or may not come with them. In the end, depending on the team surrounding you, certainly you can feel as if you're carrying the weight of more than one person on your shoulders because it's always easier for a team member who isn't as motivated as you are to simply coast alongside.

I seeI've seen this inat my current environmentemployer time and again. Now, I'm no longer a developer and instead a development manager. A huge part of what I do as a facilitator for my team is to help address situations like this one, to try and raise the bar unilaterally for the entire teamgroup. I can tell you, it's a massive challenge at times and a lot of it depends on the team you've got around you. I'm lucky, I've got a fantastic team and that makes my job a whole lot easier as a result.

So I guess what I'm trying to say is, how you feel might be more indicative of who you work with, rather than what you're actually doing. If you're feeling burnt out, maybe it's time for a career change and move to a small group of like-minded and very motivated smart people.

You'd be surprised at what a change in scenery can do!

Here's my spin:

It's the effort and continual strive to self improve that you don't always see in everyone else around you.

It's the outlook that what you've just built can always be better, could always be improved.

It's humility in that even though a solution is elegant it could always be simplified.

To be honest, these are the qualities that make someone great, not just in programming, but in just about any career when viewed through a different lense.

It's one of the many reasons truly fantastic people start with a fantastic attitude and outlook first and foremost. They tend to rise above the norm and bubble up to the top of a team if they're not surrounded by like minded people.

Others, may or may not come with them. In the end, depending on the team surrounding you, certainly you can feel as if you're carrying the weight of more than one person on your shoulders because it's always easier for a team member who isn't as motivated as you are to simply coast alongside.

I see this in my current environment time and again. Now, I'm no longer a developer and instead a development manager. A huge part of what I do as a facilitator for my team is to help address situations like this one, to try and raise the bar unilaterally for the entire team. I can tell you, it's a massive challenge at times and a lot of it depends on the team you've got around you.

So I guess what I'm trying to say is, how you feel might be more indicative of who you work with, rather than what you're actually doing. If you're feeling burnt out, maybe it's time for a career change and move to a small group of like-minded and very motivated people.

You'd be surprised at what a change in scenery can do!

Here's my spin:

It's the effort and continual strive to self improve that you don't always see in everyone else around you.

It's the outlook that what you've just built can always be better, could always be improved.

It's humility in that even though a solution is elegant it could always be simplified.

To be honest, these are the qualities that make someone great, not just in programming, but in just about any career when viewed through a different lense.

It's one of the many reasons truly fantastic people start with a fantastic attitude and outlook first and foremost. They tend to rise above the norm and bubble up to the top of a team if they're not surrounded by like minded people.

Others, may or may not come with them. In the end, depending on the team surrounding you, certainly you can feel as if you're carrying the weight of more than one person on your shoulders because it's always easier for a team member who isn't as motivated as you are to simply coast alongside.

I've seen this at my current employer time and again. Now, I'm no longer a developer and instead a development manager. A huge part of what I do as a facilitator for my team is to help address situations like this one, to try and raise the bar unilaterally for the entire group. I can tell you, it's a massive challenge at times and a lot of it depends on the team you've got around you. I'm lucky, I've got a fantastic team and that makes my job a whole lot easier as a result.

So I guess what I'm trying to say is, how you feel might be more indicative of who you work with, rather than what you're actually doing. If you're feeling burnt out, maybe it's time for a career change and move to a small group of like-minded and very motivated smart people.

You'd be surprised at what a change in scenery can do!

1
source | link

Here's my spin:

It's the effort and continual strive to self improve that you don't always see in everyone else around you.

It's the outlook that what you've just built can always be better, could always be improved.

It's humility in that even though a solution is elegant it could always be simplified.

To be honest, these are the qualities that make someone great, not just in programming, but in just about any career when viewed through a different lense.

It's one of the many reasons truly fantastic people start with a fantastic attitude and outlook first and foremost. They tend to rise above the norm and bubble up to the top of a team if they're not surrounded by like minded people.

Others, may or may not come with them. In the end, depending on the team surrounding you, certainly you can feel as if you're carrying the weight of more than one person on your shoulders because it's always easier for a team member who isn't as motivated as you are to simply coast alongside.

I see this in my current environment time and again. Now, I'm no longer a developer and instead a development manager. A huge part of what I do as a facilitator for my team is to help address situations like this one, to try and raise the bar unilaterally for the entire team. I can tell you, it's a massive challenge at times and a lot of it depends on the team you've got around you.

So I guess what I'm trying to say is, how you feel might be more indicative of who you work with, rather than what you're actually doing. If you're feeling burnt out, maybe it's time for a career change and move to a small group of like-minded and very motivated people.

You'd be surprised at what a change in scenery can do!