3 improve word choice
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The mistake you are making is that you are seeing testing as a time investment with no immediate return. It doesn't necessarily work like that.

Firstly writing tests really focusses you on what this part of your code needs to do.

Secondly running them recealsreveals bugs that would otherwise come up in testing.

Thirdly running them sometimes shows up bugs that wouldn't otherwise come up in testing and then would really bite you in the ass in production.

Fourthly if you hit a bug with a system that is running and create a unit test for it, you will not be able to re-introduce that bug later. That can be a really big help. Reintroduced bugs are common and very annoying.

Fifthly if you ever need to hand code over to someone else, a test suite will make their life far easier. Also if you have ignored a project and come back to it after a few years, you won't be so close to it any more and it will be helpful to you as well.

My experience has consistently been that across the development of a project, having decent unit tests has always made the process quicker and more reliable.

The mistake you are making is that you are seeing testing as a time investment with no immediate return. It doesn't necessarily work like that.

Firstly writing tests really focusses you on what this part of your code needs to do.

Secondly running them receals bugs that would otherwise come up in testing.

Thirdly running them sometimes shows up bugs that wouldn't otherwise come up in testing and then would really bite you in the ass in production.

Fourthly if you hit a bug with a system that is running and create a unit test for it, you will not be able to re-introduce that bug later. That can be a really big help. Reintroduced bugs are common and very annoying.

Fifthly if you ever need to hand code over to someone else, a test suite will make their life far easier. Also if you have ignored a project and come back to it after a few years, you won't be so close to it any more and it will be helpful to you as well.

My experience has consistently been that across the development of a project, having decent unit tests has always made the process quicker and more reliable.

The mistake you are making is that you are seeing testing as a time investment with no immediate return. It doesn't necessarily work like that.

Firstly writing tests really focusses you on what this part of your code needs to do.

Secondly running them reveals bugs that would otherwise come up in testing.

Thirdly running them sometimes shows up bugs that wouldn't otherwise come up in testing and then would really bite you in the ass in production.

Fourthly if you hit a bug with a system that is running and create a unit test for it, you will not be able to re-introduce that bug later. That can be a really big help. Reintroduced bugs are common and very annoying.

Fifthly if you ever need to hand code over to someone else, a test suite will make their life far easier. Also if you have ignored a project and come back to it after a few years, you won't be so close to it any more and it will be helpful to you as well.

My experience has consistently been that across the development of a project, having decent unit tests has always made the process quicker and more reliable.

2 improve word choice
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The mistake you are making is that you are seeing testing as a time investment with no immediate return. It doesn't necessarily work like that.

Firstly writing tests really focusses you on what this part of your code needs to do.

Secondly running them shows upreceals bugs that would otherwise come up in testing.

Thirdly running them sometimes shows up bugs that wouldn't otherwise come up in testing and then would really bite you in the ass in production.

Fourthly if you hit a bug with a system that is running and create a unit test for it, you will not be able to re-introduce that bug later. That can be a really big help. Reintroduced bugs are common and very annoying.

Fifthly if you ever need to hand code over to someone else, a test suite will make their life far easier. Also if you have ignored a project and come back to it after a few years, you won't be so close to it any more and it will be helpful to you as well.

My experience has consistently been that across the development of a project, having decent unit tests has always made the process quicker and more reliable.

The mistake you are making is that you are seeing testing as a time investment with no immediate return. It doesn't necessarily work like that.

Firstly writing tests really focusses you on what this part of your code needs to do.

Secondly running them shows up bugs that would otherwise come up in testing.

Thirdly running them sometimes shows up bugs that wouldn't otherwise come up in testing and then would really bite you in the ass in production.

Fourthly if you hit a bug with a system that is running and create a unit test for it, you will not be able to re-introduce that bug later. That can be a really big help. Reintroduced bugs are common and very annoying.

Fifthly if you ever need to hand code over to someone else, a test suite will make their life far easier. Also if you have ignored a project and come back to it after a few years, you won't be so close to it any more and it will be helpful to you as well.

My experience has consistently been that across the development of a project, having decent unit tests has always made the process quicker and more reliable.

The mistake you are making is that you are seeing testing as a time investment with no immediate return. It doesn't necessarily work like that.

Firstly writing tests really focusses you on what this part of your code needs to do.

Secondly running them receals bugs that would otherwise come up in testing.

Thirdly running them sometimes shows up bugs that wouldn't otherwise come up in testing and then would really bite you in the ass in production.

Fourthly if you hit a bug with a system that is running and create a unit test for it, you will not be able to re-introduce that bug later. That can be a really big help. Reintroduced bugs are common and very annoying.

Fifthly if you ever need to hand code over to someone else, a test suite will make their life far easier. Also if you have ignored a project and come back to it after a few years, you won't be so close to it any more and it will be helpful to you as well.

My experience has consistently been that across the development of a project, having decent unit tests has always made the process quicker and more reliable.

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The mistake you are making is that you are seeing testing as a time investment with no immediate return. It doesn't necessarily work like that.

Firstly writing tests really focusses you on what this part of your code needs to do.

Secondly running them shows up bugs that would otherwise come up in testing.

Thirdly running them sometimes shows up bugs that wouldn't otherwise come up in testing and then would really bite you in the ass in production.

Fourthly if you hit a bug with a system that is running and create a unit test for it, you will not be able to re-introduce that bug later. That can be a really big help. Reintroduced bugs are common and very annoying.

Fifthly if you ever need to hand code over to someone else, a test suite will make their life far easier. Also if you have ignored a project and come back to it after a few years, you won't be so close to it any more and it will be helpful to you as well.

My experience has consistently been that across the development of a project, having decent unit tests has always made the process quicker and more reliable.